Man discovers 30 rattlesnakes under his shed and it's the stuff of nightmares

Man discovers 30 rattlesnakes under his shed and it's the stuff of nightmares

If all you do is stay home, you miss out on seeing stunning marvels of nature. For example, you could go for a hike and see a 'million' ants build a living bridge to attack a wasp's nest. Or you could go whale-watching, and witness one of those agile behemoths leap right over your head. Yeah, you can see footage of these wonders online, but it's just not the same as experiencing it first-hand.

And sometimes you find omething spectacular just outside your front door. In Gorman, Texas, Bobby Cowan and two friends were hanging out at his ranch, when noticed a rattlesnake slither underneath an hunting shed. The trio used a skid loader to hoist up the abandoned structure, and noticed dozens of rattlesnakes hiding underneath.

Cowan recorded a video of the nightmarish discovery and shared the footage on Facebook. The video has more than 3.7 million views, and yes, many people said "KILL IT WITH FIRE" in the comments. It's a cool clip to watch the safety of your home, but how would you feel if you saw the snake pit in real life? I would probably run away and not stop until I got to Canada.

"We were definitely — what’s the right word — freaked out, maybe," Cowan told the New York Post. "Very, very surprised. As soon as we lifted up the building, we slammed it right back down because there were so many of them."

"We knew we weren’t in that much danger if we didn’t get too close, and so then we were able to look at them,’ he continued "We knew we weren’t in that much danger if we didn’t get too close, and so then we were able to look at them."

Cowan told the San Antonio Express-News he counted 36 rattlesnakes, but there could have been as many as 50. And sorry, terrified Facebook users, they did not splash gasoline at the snake pit and toss a match. Snakes are animals too, you monsters!

Sure, rattlers can be dangerous, even after death. Earlier this year, one man miraculously survived, after getting bitten by the head of a decapitated rattlesnake. However, just like bats and spiders, they play an essential role in our ecosystem.

Cowan and friends reportedly used long sticks and trash cans to move the coil of rattlesnakes to another part of the ranch, where they would not harm the livestock. That's right, according to the internet, a group of rattlesnakes is called a "coil" or "rhumba." I'd go with "spine-chilling nightmare," but hey, whatever you say, scientists.

Actually, come to think of it, there are some marvels of nature I don't want to see in real life. A rhumba of rattlesnakes. A cluster of spiders. A gam of sharks. I think I'll just stay home forever.