Mutant three-eyed snake discovered in the Australian outback

Mutant three-eyed snake discovered in the Australian outback

Australia is home to many incredible, terrifying creatures that will haunt your dreams forever: giant spiders, monster fish, muscular kangaroos, and of course, venomous snakes. However, Northern Territory rangers discovered a fresh horror while working near the awesomely named town of Humpty Doo. Move over, Three-Eyed Raven from Game of Thrones - you've got competition!

"Our Rangers found a three-eyed snake on the Arnhem Highway near Humpty Doo just out of Darwin," The Northern Territory Parks and Recreation Commission wrote on Facebook. "It was a juvenile, approximately 40cm [16 in] long. The snake is peculiar as an x-ray revealed it was not two separate heads forged together, rather it appeared to be one skull with an additional eye socket and three functioning eyes."

three-eyed snake Credit: Northern Territory Parks and Wildlife Commission

"It was generally agreed that the eye likely developed very early during the embryonic stage of development," the post continued. "It is extremely unlikely that this is from environmental factors and is almost certainly a natural occurrence as malformed reptiles are relatively common." Then, proving that absolutely everyone watches Game of Thrones, they added, "The three-eyed snake warns The Dry is coming!"

three-eyed snake Credit: Northern Territory Parks and Wildlife Commission

The malformed snake, whom the rangers named Monty, was a three-month old carpet python. Carpet pythons are a nonvenomous species commonly found in Australia, and grow up to ten feet long. They kill prey by constriction, typically feasting on birds, lizards and small mammals. However, due to his deformities, Monty struggled to feed.

Typical carpet python

regular carpet python Credit: Getty

Wildlife experts picked up the unique reptile and attempted to care him, but sadly, Monty didn't make it. "It’s remarkable it was able to survive so long in the wild with it’s deformity and he was struggling to feed before he died last week,' Ranger Ray Chatto told NT News. Monty's remains are currently being kept at the CSIRO's scientific research center in Darwin. Rest in power, Monty!

But hey, you don't have to fly to the Land Down Under to find incredible, terrifying creatures. A woman in Virginia found an "exceptionally rare" two-headed venomous snake in her backyard. The world is a nightmare!