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Jennifer Lawrence opens up about that nude photo leak

Not only are women's bodies treated like veritable commodities in the society we live in, but they are also held to near impossible beauty standards. I mean, whether you're browsing through magazines or scrolling through your social media feed, you'll undoubtedly come across images of retouched models or immaculately filtered and contoured Instagram stars. And as such, it's hard for us normal folk not to feel the pressure to try and resemble the paragons of beauty that we encounter on a near-daily basis.

However, even those who have won the genetic lottery, and comprise the top one per cent in society, have, at one point or the other, suffered as a result of society's regressive stance on women's bodies. Case in point: in 2014, a collection of nearly 500 private pictures of several celebrities, mostly women, and with many containing nudity, were leaked and disseminated on social media platforms such as Reddit and Imgur. Victims of the hack included household names such as Kirsten Dunst, Jennifer Lawrence, Kate Upton and Kaley Cuoco.

And naturally, the women in question are still affected by this blatant breach of their privacy. In fact, Jennifer Lawrence recently opened up about the whole ordeal and likened it to being "gang-banged by the f***ing planet".

Jennifer Lawrence has revealed how vulnerable she felt after her private images were leaked on the internet back in 2014. Speaking on an episode of The Hollywood Reporter's Awards Chatter Podcast, which was released on Monday, the 27-year-old actress explained that even though the hack occurred three years ago, she is "still actually processing it".

And displaying the extent of the trauma she experienced, the Mother! actress continued:

"I don't know, I feel like I got gang-banged by the f***ing planet — like, there's not one person in the world that is not capable of seeing these intimate photos of me.

"You can just be at a barbecue and somebody can just pull them up on their phone. That was a really impossible thing to process."

The incident left lasting scars which affected Lawrence's perception of herself, forcing her to re-asses her influence as a "role model":

"I think, like, a year and a half ago, somebody said something to me about how I was 'a good role model for girls,' and I had to go into the bathroom and sob because I felt like an imposter — I felt like, 'I can't believe somebody still feels that way after what happened' [...] It's so many different things to process when you've been violated like that.'

However, Lawrence went on to explain that although she was left so shaken by the experience, she never had any interest in pursuing a lawsuit as she needed that time to "heal":
"A lot of women were affected, and a lot of them reached out to me about suing Apple or suing — and none of that was gonna really bring me peace, none of that was gonna bring my nude body back to me and Nic [Lawrence's ex boyfriend], the person that they were intended for. 
"A lot of women were affected, and a lot of them reached out to me about suing Apple or suing — and none of that was gonna really bring me peace, none of that was gonna bring my nude body back to me and Nic [Lawrence's ex boyfriend], the person that they were intended for. 

"It wasn't gonna bring any of that back. So I wasn't interested in suing everybody; I was just interested in healing."

"It wasn't gonna bring any of that back. So I wasn't interested in suing everybody; I was just interested in healing."

Certainly, the actress was not the only celebrity targeted in the hack. As many as 100 celebrities had their private photographs exposed to the internet after Edward Majerczynk uploaded the images to the imageboard, 4chan on August 31st 2014.

Earlier in 2017, the 29-year-old, who hails from Chicago, was sentenced to nine months in prison for his crimes. He was also ordered to pay $5,700 in restitution fees.

Although it's unlikely that Jennifer Lawrence will ever be able to forget about this violation of her privacy, we can only hope that she, and the other victims of the leak, have experienced some sense of closure since Edward Majerczynk was convicted.