More and more studies are linking bacon with 'cancer-causing' chemicals

More and more studies are linking bacon with 'cancer-causing' chemicals

In the breakfast food Hall of Fame, there's plenty to enjoy on any given day, but tell me, folks: is there any food you eat, at breakfast or at any other point, as good as bacon?! When you first place those crispy, greasy strips into your mouth, it's easy to say that the answer is a resounding "yes", but science says that bacon's not as good for you as it tastes.

Yep: we already know about the high cholesterol, sodium and high fat content that comes with every strip of bacon, but more studies by the day are saying that bacon is a pretty high risk factor for several kinds of cancer.

Bacon Credit: Getty

Experts are urgently discussing with the government about erasing the cancer risk associated with everyone's favourite cut of pork, as well as other cuts of processed meats, and not just any experts, either - we're talking NHS doctors, cancer specialists, and politicians.

The cause of the increased cancer risk - according to these experts - is the presence of nitrites in bacon and other processed meat, helping them to preserve and cure them. Unfortunately, these nitrites are also reportedly responsible for nitrosamines, which are believed to be responsible for bowel cancer.

Bacon Credit: Getty

These experts came together to urge some changes in the processed meat industry - there are, fortunately ways of processing these meats without using the cancerous nitrites.

"There is a consensus of scientific opinion that nitrites in processed meats result in the production of carcinogenic nitrosamines - and therefore increase cancer risk for those who regularly consume traditional bacon and ham. 

For these reasons, we are concerned that not enough is being done to raise awareness of nitrites in our processed meat and their health risks, in stark contrast to warnings regularly issued regarding sugar and fattening foods."

Bacon Credit: Getty

Senior cardiologist Aseem Malhotra is one of many experts who have spoken out because of what he perceives to be a failure to act on the overwhelming evidence in front of us. A study from all the way back in 2015 from World Health Organisation said that nitrites in processed meats was responsible for 34,000 cancer deaths, labelling bacon and other meats like bacon as group one carcinogens.

"The vast majority of bacon on sale today still contains these dangerous carcinogens Not only this, reminiscent of the tobacco industry's stance in the 1990s, some of those in the business of making and regulating food continue to claim that health risks from nitrite-cured meat are negligible. The evidence says otherwise.

Government action to remove nitrites from processed meats should not be far away. Nor can a day of reckoning for those who continue to dispute the incontrovertible facts."

"The meat industry must act fast, act now," he added in dramatic fashion, lest the meat industry go the same way as the tobacco industry - with its reputation permanently stained as a result of the studies piling up. On the whole, it's a sorry state of affairs for the process industry, but hopefully they can get their act together soon.