You can now cure your hangover by eating an ice cream bar, and we're all over it

You can now cure your hangover by eating an ice cream bar, and we're all over it

Unless you've never had a drink or somehow have an amazing constitution for alcohol, the chances are that you have experienced a hangover at some point in your life - and you'll know that they aren't fun. Between the deafening headache, the relentless nausea, and the overall sense of sheer dread, it's difficult to say what the worst part the 'morning after' is, exactly.

One thing's for sure, though: when you're hanging, you'd do pretty much anything to get out of it.

There are a few preventatives and cures that sort of work, albeit with varying success. Drinking lots of water before going to sleep helps some people alleviate the worst symptoms, as does loading up on carbs before hitting the booze. But now there's a slightly more enjoyable way of treating the hangover blues, and it comes in the form of an ice cream bar.

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Ice cream manufacturers in South Korea have come up with a treat called the 'Gyeondyo-bar', which roughly translates as "hang in there". Priced at just $1, the Gyeondyo-bar claims to be the first iced treat in the world with the capabilities of alleviating the effects of a hangover.

The "science" (and we use that term loosely) behind it is founded in the juice of the raisin tree fruit. The juice of these fruits has been used in Korea since the 1600s, and is reportedly quite effective when it comes to shaking off the post-booze blues.

It also has a tart, grapefruit-flavoured outer shell, making it a pleasant-tasting treat even for those who don't need to cure their hangovers.

"Mixing such ingredients with cold ice cream could be an effective way to lower body temperature for people whose body temperature has risen from drinking," said Dr. Lee Byeong Sam at KyungHee Korean Medical Clinic in Seoul. "But it is not recommended for people with naturally low body temperatures."

cocktails Credit: Pexels

The hangover cure market is currently booming in South Korea, as their drinking culture differs greatly from the sort of attitude we hold in the likes of the UK and USA. Rather than only hitting the bottle as part of a celebration or on the weekend, many South Koreans will drink heavily on weeknights as part of standard work culture - so their need for a reliable remedy slightly more pressing than it is in the west.

However, if the Gyeondyo-bar ever does make it out of South Korea and onto supermarket shelves elsewhere in the world, we're sure it would be greatly appreciated. Preferably by the weekend, if possible.