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Vote to impeach Donald Trump will take place next week

Donald Trump hasn't been the most popular of presidents. In fact, over 55% of the population of the United States currently land on the 'disapproval' side of the approval ratings taken. Many of his controversial attempts to change government legislature and other inflammatory comments have lead his dissenters to call for impeachment, especially in light of the alleged collusion with the Russian government during the election.

Now, congressman Al Green has vowed to force a House vote on impeaching Trump, which should take place sometime next week. Green is a Democrat representing parts of Houston, Texas, but is backed up by other members of congress. Marcia Fudge, Steve Cohen, Luis Gutierrez, John Yarmuth and Adriano Espaillat co-sponsored the introduction of these impeachment articles.

Green was the first member of Congress to call for impeachment on the floor of the House back in May this year. Now, he has introduced a "privileged" bill, which means it requires action from the other members within two legislative days. In his speech, which was made on November 30, he said:

“I refuse to stand idly by as a billionaire bigot does irreparable harm to my country. A billionaire bigot who tolerates the KKK, but won’t tolerate Islam."

"A billionaire bigot who tolerates anti-Semitism, racism, sexism, ethnocentrism, xenophobia and homophobia.”

This comes in the wake of Trump's recent retweeting of Britain First, a nationalist far-right political organisation known for spreading hate speech across the UK. He broadcasted three anti-Muslim videos shared by Jayda Fransen, deputy leader of Britain First, which were both inflammatory and unverified.

One of the videos was titled "Muslim migrant beats up Dutch boy on crutches", while the Dutch government confimed that the teenager responsible for the attack was "born and raised in the Netherlands", and a police spokesman stating that "he is not a Muslim or a migrant".

Fransen was charged in May this year for causing religiously aggravated harassment over leaflets the organization distributed, and Trump's sharing of her material has lead to condemnation by a number of British politicians, including Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and Prime Minister Theresa May, whose spokesman said that Britain First spread "hateful narratives which peddle lies and stoke tensions".

Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, added:

"Britain First seeks to divide communities and intimidate minorities, especially our Muslim friends and neighbours. Britain First does not share our values of tolerance and solidarity. God calls us as Christians to love our neighbour and seek the flourishing of all in our communities, societies and nations."

"I join the urgent call of faith groups and others for President Trump not just to remove these tweets, but to make clear his opposition to racism and hatred in all forms"

Green has said that a primary reason for impeachment is Trump's "fuelling an alt-right hate machine", as well as citing "causing immediate injury to American society" in the impeachment articles.

Some experts have commented that the bill is likely to fail, as the Republican party have a majority in the lower chamber. Impeachment doesn't guarantee that Trump will be removed from the presidency. If the vote passes, it will trigger a public trial in the Senate.