Black Christmas trees are the festive trend for people who want to watch the world burn

Black Christmas trees are the festive trend for people who want to watch the world burn

For many people, Christmas is the most wonderful time of year; myself included. I can be a total grouch for the majority of the year, but something about seeing all the decorations in the home and the bunting in the street, the sounds of carols and Christmas tunes playing in the shops, and the smell of nutmeg, cinnamon and cloves; it all just gives me goose pimples all over. For me though, Christmas doesn't really begin until me and my dad have struggled our way up a rickety ladder, climbed up into the attic, and dragged out the artificial Christmas tree we keep up there - the veteran of many a festive season.

Then my mother and I will spend ages decorating it with all manner of tinsel and baubles. Now, some yuletide purists might be outraged by the fact that we've got a fake tree and not a real one; but apart from the lack of smell, and the absence of shed needles, I don't think you'd notice that it was a fake.

An image of a black Christmas tree. Credit: Instagram

There's also another advantage to having a fake tree: the fact that they come in a wide variety of colours. If you don't like the festive colour palette of red and green, then you could try something a bit more original. In fact, if you're of a gothic disposition you could even get yourself a black Christmas tree instead. Now you might baulk at the idea of a monochrome tree, and consider it to be too dour and depressing. But apparently, black Chrismas trees are getting more and more popular - and not just among colour-blind people.

According to a recent study conducted by the artificial tree retailer Treetopia, after the traditional gree, black is actually the second most popular artificial tree colour in five states, including (Arizona, Delaware, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin, and also in Washington, D.C. The study also noted that: "White trees tend to dominate the Midwest and south, while some northeastern states prefer silver. In the west, colourful trees in pink, red, and orange dominate."

Not only that, but if you if you search for the #blackchristmastree tag on Instagram you'll end up with 10,000 results. Pretty amazing right? All over social media, black tree aficionados have been sharing pictures of their stylish trees. Yup; it's fair to say that more and more people are embracing their inner emo and getting a black tree instead.

An image of a black Christmas tree. Credit: Instagram

The Christmas tree tradition has its origins in Germany, Latvia and Estonia, where medieval peasants would often decorate trees with hanging fruit, sweetmeats, nuts and sweets. The tradition didn't really migrate to the rest of the world until the early 19th century, when the German Hanoverian Queen Victoria brought her childhood tradition into the forefront of Britain's consciousness. Since then, other countries have followed suit and have diligently put up trees in their own homes as well.