Woman tries to order novelty hats from Amazon, gets illegal contraband instead

Woman tries to order novelty hats from Amazon, gets illegal contraband instead

As one of the first ever shopping retailers to have made its home on the net, Amazon has become a household name in over a hundred countries around the globe. We all know it, we all use it, and - sometimes misguidedly - we all trust it.

Unfortunately, like everything else on the planet, Amazon isn't perfect, and sometimes it makes mistakes. Personally, I can recall at least one time when I've ordered something in a "new" condition, and it's turned up looking like it'd been shipped from a war zone, and - just recently - the retail giant came under fire for allowing merchandise which promoted slavery to be sold on its platform.

This week, though, Amazon made what is possibly the most bizarre mistake of its 24-year lifespan, and shipped an illegal substance to a woman who just wanted some funny hats.

Credit: Twitter/Meagan Day

Meagan Day, a writer from California, had intended to order the (oh-so-eloquently described) RussianBear White Felt Hats to improve her sauna experience, but instead received something very different in the post.

She doesn't know how it happened, why it happened, or what sort of circumstances would ever be in place to make it even remotely possible that this could happen, but - somehow - she didn't get her hats. Instead, she got a package from Ukraine. And it contained illegal contraband.

More specifically, it was full of a banned drug made from blue scorpion venom.

Credit: Twitter/Meagan Day

The cancer drug has been around since the 1990s, and is made from heavily-diluted venom which has been harvested from scorpions that have been given electric shocks. When it was first put on the market, the substance was a lot more potent, but is now extremely watered down because there isn't enough venom available to cater to such a huge (and, by the looks of it, illegal) demand.

Though it isn't necessarily harmful, the drug is contraband because it has never been scientifically proven to work. However, it's still sold in Cuba.

Anyway, now hatless and in possession of a super sketchy substance, Meagan didn't really know what to do.

Credit: Twitter/Meagan Day

"Theory: somewhere on the dark web are instructions to purchase these oligarchical felt hats from Amazon in order to receive the illegal scorpion drugs," she wrote later on. "The seller intentionally chose a bizarre niche product that no one would ever organically, mistakenly order. Except me of course."

However, another Twitter user commented on the picture to let Meagen know that he had ordered from the exact same place and did actually get a hat, so it seemed that the writer was just the victim of a really strange mix-up at the sauna hat/illegal drug factory.

Ever the opportunist, though, Meagan decided to use the situation to her advantage:

Credit: Twitter/Meagan Day

As far as getting the wrong item goes, then, Meagan didn't do too badly in the grand scheme of things. Not only did she get a refund and some new scorpion venom, she also managed to spin a pretty good Twitter story out of it, too.