Jupiter will come so close to Earth this month you can see its largest moons with binoculars

Jupiter will come so close to Earth this month you can see its largest moons with binoculars

Jupiter, the solar system's largest planet, is approaching its closest point to Earth in 2019.

According to NASA, the gas giant will be at "its biggest and brightest this month, rising at dusk and remaining visible all night".

This will peak on the night of Monday, June 10, when, depending on where you are in the world, the planet will be clearly visible to the naked eye - with binoculars or a telescope greatly enhancing its clarity.

NASA's Juno spacecraft is orbiting Jupiter and has captured this striking footage:

Jupiter reaches opposition on this date, which is a yearly occurrence when Jupiter, Earth and the Sun are arranged in a straight line, with Earth in the middle.

Opposition is the best time of year to see Jupiter as it will be visible in the sky all night and is at its closest to our own planet.

Although opposition occurs on a specific date, the entire month will provide you with a good opportunity to observe the planet.

But if you want to be able to spot Jupiter's four largest moons, and the "banded clouds that encircle the planet", you will certainly need a pair of binoculars or a telescope, NASA says.

Scientists believe the planet has a total of 79 moons - 53 have been named while 26 have yet to be officially named.

To get the best views, you'll have to ensure you're located in the optimum spot. Unfortunately, for UK-based space enthusiasts, spotting the planet will be tricky due to its declination. Those who are watching from the Southern Hemisphere will get a much clearer view.