People call for child-free flights as passenger films baby crying non-stop during 29-hour flight

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By Asiya Ali

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Social media users are calling for child-free flights after a passenger recorded the incessant screams of a baby during his 29-hour journey.

A TikToker named Henry Beasley - who goes by the handle @balubrigada - shared a video two years ago about his long flight from New Zealand to Germany.

In the video, Beasley captured his bemused reactions as a baby continuously screamed in the background. He also added an overlay text that read: "Rate my 29-hour flight to Berlin."

As the grueling journey went on, the TikToker wryly noted the child "got some lungs" and had "great projection," and in a second clip, he quipped "nice long one here" amid the guttural screams.

Check out Beasley's TikTok below:

A tick begins to form in Beasley's left eye as he furiously chews gum amid the endless screaming which he also compares to the sound of a kettle boiling. He even rates the cries, including one with the caption "nice long one here, 100," and in the end, gave the child's "stellar performance" and "incredible stamina" a "10/10."

The distressing video amassed 14.5 million views and 2.8 million likes on the social media platform, with many people taking to the comment section to sympathize with Beasley.

One person quipped: "Oh lord, it’s the eye twitch for me. Thank god you’re okay," while another said: "29 hours of that? sounds like the kid is having a medical emergency."

A third user chimed in: "The reason why I waited till my kid was bigger before allowing her to go on flights. We gotta be considerate of others!! Tsk," and a fourth added: "The flight attendant should [intervene] and ask the parents to control their kid, the other passengers are paying to have good flight, it's unfair."

However, some users acknowledged how difficult it would be to parent a baby on a flight, with one person pointing out: "Oh man..but can you imagine being the parents trying to handle that? It’s mortifying, exhausting, mortifying, embarrassing….did I say mortifying?"

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Some passengers wish to travel without children, especially on long-haul flights. Credit: Westend61 / Getty

Meanwhile, some people suggested that "child-free flights" should be introduced for passengers who wish to travel without children, especially on long-haul flights.

"Yes adult only flights please," someone on Facebook wrote. "I don’t pay for a flight to listen to kids screaming...and kicking the back of my chair for the entire flight and yes most times good parenting is an issue!"

A second user shared: "I think child-free flights should be an option...some children don't need to be around adults," while another added: "I do agree with the people saying that we should have flights where no kids under at least 10 should be [allowed]."

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Child-free flights are a reality on some airlines. Credit: Susumu Yoshioka / Getty

Interestingly, child-free flights are a reality on some airlines, with Turkish-owned Corendon Airlines being the latest to reveal it will have an adults-only zone in its planes, where passengers over the age of 16 can travel in peace.

Of course, such an upgrade doesn't come for free, but it's relatively cheap to get a seat in the adults-only section on their route on the 432-seat Airbus 350 from Amsterdam to Curaçao.

There will be 93 seats available in the zone at the front of the plane, which will be separated from the rest of the cabin by walls and curtains, and passengers will have to pay a reported €45 ($49) each way for the privilege of sitting there - which is pretty reasonable to ensure you get to relax on the 10-hour trip.

Atilay Uslu, the founder of Corendon, said in a statement: "Onboard our flights, we always strive to respond to the different needs of our customers," as cited by Business Insider.

"We also believe this can have a positive effect on parents traveling with small children. They can enjoy the flight without worrying if their children are making too much noise."

Malaysia's AirAsia, India's IndiGo, and Singapore's Scoot Airlines also offer child-free or "quiet" zones.

Featured image credit: Photo by Joel Sharpe / Getty

People call for child-free flights as passenger films baby crying non-stop during 29-hour flight

vt-author-image

By Asiya Ali

Article saved!Article saved!

Social media users are calling for child-free flights after a passenger recorded the incessant screams of a baby during his 29-hour journey.

A TikToker named Henry Beasley - who goes by the handle @balubrigada - shared a video two years ago about his long flight from New Zealand to Germany.

In the video, Beasley captured his bemused reactions as a baby continuously screamed in the background. He also added an overlay text that read: "Rate my 29-hour flight to Berlin."

As the grueling journey went on, the TikToker wryly noted the child "got some lungs" and had "great projection," and in a second clip, he quipped "nice long one here" amid the guttural screams.

Check out Beasley's TikTok below:

A tick begins to form in Beasley's left eye as he furiously chews gum amid the endless screaming which he also compares to the sound of a kettle boiling. He even rates the cries, including one with the caption "nice long one here, 100," and in the end, gave the child's "stellar performance" and "incredible stamina" a "10/10."

The distressing video amassed 14.5 million views and 2.8 million likes on the social media platform, with many people taking to the comment section to sympathize with Beasley.

One person quipped: "Oh lord, it’s the eye twitch for me. Thank god you’re okay," while another said: "29 hours of that? sounds like the kid is having a medical emergency."

A third user chimed in: "The reason why I waited till my kid was bigger before allowing her to go on flights. We gotta be considerate of others!! Tsk," and a fourth added: "The flight attendant should [intervene] and ask the parents to control their kid, the other passengers are paying to have good flight, it's unfair."

However, some users acknowledged how difficult it would be to parent a baby on a flight, with one person pointing out: "Oh man..but can you imagine being the parents trying to handle that? It’s mortifying, exhausting, mortifying, embarrassing….did I say mortifying?"

wp-image-1263249007 size-full
Some passengers wish to travel without children, especially on long-haul flights. Credit: Westend61 / Getty

Meanwhile, some people suggested that "child-free flights" should be introduced for passengers who wish to travel without children, especially on long-haul flights.

"Yes adult only flights please," someone on Facebook wrote. "I don’t pay for a flight to listen to kids screaming...and kicking the back of my chair for the entire flight and yes most times good parenting is an issue!"

A second user shared: "I think child-free flights should be an option...some children don't need to be around adults," while another added: "I do agree with the people saying that we should have flights where no kids under at least 10 should be [allowed]."

wp-image-1263249008 size-full
Child-free flights are a reality on some airlines. Credit: Susumu Yoshioka / Getty

Interestingly, child-free flights are a reality on some airlines, with Turkish-owned Corendon Airlines being the latest to reveal it will have an adults-only zone in its planes, where passengers over the age of 16 can travel in peace.

Of course, such an upgrade doesn't come for free, but it's relatively cheap to get a seat in the adults-only section on their route on the 432-seat Airbus 350 from Amsterdam to Curaçao.

There will be 93 seats available in the zone at the front of the plane, which will be separated from the rest of the cabin by walls and curtains, and passengers will have to pay a reported €45 ($49) each way for the privilege of sitting there - which is pretty reasonable to ensure you get to relax on the 10-hour trip.

Atilay Uslu, the founder of Corendon, said in a statement: "Onboard our flights, we always strive to respond to the different needs of our customers," as cited by Business Insider.

"We also believe this can have a positive effect on parents traveling with small children. They can enjoy the flight without worrying if their children are making too much noise."

Malaysia's AirAsia, India's IndiGo, and Singapore's Scoot Airlines also offer child-free or "quiet" zones.

Featured image credit: Photo by Joel Sharpe / Getty