Scientists reveal why kinky sex is the best

Scientists reveal why kinky sex is the best

Are you someone who likes getting freaky in the sack? Or are you a bit vanilla? Do you like whips, chains, handcuffs and gags? Or, would you rather turn the lights off and slip passionlessly into missionary? Whatever your sexual preference, as long as you feel good doing it, that's all the matters.

However, it's a well known fact that kinky sex is good for you as it keeps stress levels low and keeps your mental health in check. It seems pretty contradictory that being a freak in the sheets keeps you sane, but it does. So why does kinky sex feel so good? What is it about being tied up and slapped about that is enjoyable? Thankfully, science has the answer.

Eighty four per cent of us say that we would like a bit more kink in our lives, and half of us admit to having freaky sex at some point in our past. Seeing as getting kinky is so commonly practised and desired, it begs the question as to why we love it. Well, according to Broadly, the reason kinky sex feels so good is that it takes you brain to a magical, pleasure induced wonderland called "subspace".

If you've ever had kinky sex, you will know what subspace is, although you probably didn't know the official terminology for it. But for the more vanilla of you, subspace refers to the floaty or high feeling that comes from a rush of endorphins through your body once you practice your freakiest fantasies.

Maitresse Madeline Marlowe, a professional dominatrix told Broadly: "For all of us, endorphins bind to opiate receptors to naturally relieve pain, since BDSM play can include power exchange and masochistic acts, endorphins are one of the most common neurotransmitters [produced]."

So, to put that into simple terms: BDSM sometimes hurts, but because you're enjoying yourself, that pain turns into pleasure.

"Like many potentially stressful or extreme experiences (e.g. sky-diving, fire-walking), individuals' bodies react to that stress when they engage in BDSM," Science of BDSM researcher Kathryn Klement told Broadly.

"We interpret these cortisol results to mean that when people engage in BDSM play (as the receiver of sensations) or extreme rituals, their bodies release a hormone usually associated with stress. However, we've also found that people subjectively report their psychological stress decreasing, so there is a disconnect between what the body is experiencing, and what the individual is perceiving."

Basically, kinky sex is physically very stressful and freaks your body out. Because of this, our adrenals release the stress hormone, cortisol, to compensate for the sensations you are experiencing. Normally, this would put you in fight or flight mode, such as when you're in a ruckus or something is attacking you, and naturally, it doesn't feel very good.

But because you're banging and enjoying yourself, your body only stresses out physically rather than psychologically. The result of this cocktail of endorphins and stress leaves you with a delicious feeling of being in a bit of pain but not feeling like you might actually die.

And that, ladies and gentlemen, concludes our sex education lesson for today. Next time your partner brings up the idea of BDSM, maybe think about dipping your toes in; after all, it's good for you!