Survivor in Brock Turner case reveals her name in new memoir

Survivor in Brock Turner case reveals her name in new memoir

The woman who was sexually assaulted by Brock Turner in 2015 - and whose 7000-word victim impact statement changed the way that we, as a society, think and speak about sexual crimes - has formally introduced herself to the world, ahead of the publication of her upcoming memoir.

Chanel Miller, who was previously only known as "Emily Doe", penned the viral statement which spoke to survivors across the globe; informing them that they not alone. Miller's legacy helped pave the way for the #MeToo and Time's Up movements, which were sparked two years later with The New York Times' explosive exposé on the allegations of sexual harassment made against movie producer, Harvey Weinstein.

Per The New York Times, who revealed the erstwhile Stanford student's name early Wednesday morning, Miller will be publishing her memoir Know My Name in September, in which she will "reclaim the story of her sexual assault".

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"Emily Doe’s experience illuminates a culture built to protect perpetrators and a criminal justice system designed to fail the most vulnerable," said the memoir's publisher, Viking Books, in a press release.

"The book will introduce readers to the writer whose words have already changed their world and move them with its accounting of her courage and resilience," Viking editor-and-chief, Andrea Schulz, continued. "The book will introduce readers to the writer whose words have already changed their world and move them with its accounting of her courage and resilience."

Today, CBS' 60 Minutes, announced that they will be airing Miller's first interview on the 22nd of September. Ahead of that date, they have released a clip of her reading her impact statement on social media.

Turner, who also studied at Stanford University, was later convicted of assault with intent to commit rape of an intoxicated/unconscious person, penetration of an intoxicated person and penetration of an unconscious person. Although he initially faced up to 14 years in prison, he was sentenced to six months in county jail, where he served just three for "good behaviour".

Aaron Persky, the judge who sentenced Turner, was recalled from office in June 2018, becoming the first California jurist recalled from the bench in 86 years.

“It is one of the most important books that I’ve ever published,” Schulz told The New York Times. She said that she hopes it will "change the culture that we live in and the assumptions we make about what survivors should be expected to go through to get justice."

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention one in five of US women are raped at some point in their lives, and 1 in 3 are subject to sexual violence which involves physical contact.