Guy sailing the Atlantic comes across giant shark - sparks 'megalodon' fears

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By stefan armitage

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One man's encounter with a massive shark during a sailing trip has left many speculating about the possible return of the megalodon - the prehistoric ocean giant.

Alex Albrecht shared a jaw-dropping video on TikTok, where he posted under the handle '@.alex.albrecht', showing the enormous shark he came across during his six-week journey in the Atlantic. Albrecht captioned the video: "Sailed six weeks in the Atlantic saw this big f***ing shark."

The video quickly went viral, amassing over 41 million views in just a few days. Social media users couldn't help but speculate about the identity of the colossal creature, with one popular theory being the megalodon.

Check out the video below - what do you think?

"It may be a juvenile Megalodon," one person commented, with a second added: "It's a megalodon!"

The megalodon was a colossal ocean predator that could grow up to 60 feet in length, dwarfing even the largest great white sharks on record.

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People feared the video may have signalled the return of the megalodon. Credit: TikTok

Now, the megalodon certainly would be a creature to fear. According to the Natural History Museum, the ocean-dwelling behemoths could grow up to 60 feet in length, which is roughly three times as long as the largest great white ever recorded.

But before we get Jason Statham on the phone to tackle the "Meg", it's also worth noting that the megalodon went extinct around 3.6 million years ago.

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A large fossil tooth from a Megalodon shark found in Venice, Florida. Credit: Daniel A. Leifheit / Getty

So it is far more likely that the majority of commenters were right to assume the creature was a harmless basking shark.

According to Oceana.org, basking sharks are harmless to humans as they primarily feed on tiny planktonic prey and have small teeth. Nevertheless, these gentle giants can reach impressive lengths of up to 45 feet and weigh up to 10,000 pounds, making them a formidable presence in the ocean.

Basking sharks have a lengthy lifespan, often living up to fifty years, and can be found in large groups of around 100 individuals. The thought of encountering a group of these leviathans while swimming in the ocean is certainly a breathtaking prospect.

size-large wp-image-1263241657
Basking sharks are the second-largest living shark species on our planet. Credit: Corbis/VCG/Getty

While the megalodon may remain extinct, the oceans continue to harbor awe-inspiring creatures like the basking shark, reminding us of the marvels - and dangers - that dwell beneath the waves.

Featured image credit: Cat Gennaro / Getty

Guy sailing the Atlantic comes across giant shark - sparks 'megalodon' fears

vt-author-image

By stefan armitage

Article saved!Article saved!

One man's encounter with a massive shark during a sailing trip has left many speculating about the possible return of the megalodon - the prehistoric ocean giant.

Alex Albrecht shared a jaw-dropping video on TikTok, where he posted under the handle '@.alex.albrecht', showing the enormous shark he came across during his six-week journey in the Atlantic. Albrecht captioned the video: "Sailed six weeks in the Atlantic saw this big f***ing shark."

The video quickly went viral, amassing over 41 million views in just a few days. Social media users couldn't help but speculate about the identity of the colossal creature, with one popular theory being the megalodon.

Check out the video below - what do you think?

"It may be a juvenile Megalodon," one person commented, with a second added: "It's a megalodon!"

The megalodon was a colossal ocean predator that could grow up to 60 feet in length, dwarfing even the largest great white sharks on record.

size-large wp-image-1263241654
People feared the video may have signalled the return of the megalodon. Credit: TikTok

Now, the megalodon certainly would be a creature to fear. According to the Natural History Museum, the ocean-dwelling behemoths could grow up to 60 feet in length, which is roughly three times as long as the largest great white ever recorded.

But before we get Jason Statham on the phone to tackle the "Meg", it's also worth noting that the megalodon went extinct around 3.6 million years ago.

size-large wp-image-1263241656
A large fossil tooth from a Megalodon shark found in Venice, Florida. Credit: Daniel A. Leifheit / Getty

So it is far more likely that the majority of commenters were right to assume the creature was a harmless basking shark.

According to Oceana.org, basking sharks are harmless to humans as they primarily feed on tiny planktonic prey and have small teeth. Nevertheless, these gentle giants can reach impressive lengths of up to 45 feet and weigh up to 10,000 pounds, making them a formidable presence in the ocean.

Basking sharks have a lengthy lifespan, often living up to fifty years, and can be found in large groups of around 100 individuals. The thought of encountering a group of these leviathans while swimming in the ocean is certainly a breathtaking prospect.

size-large wp-image-1263241657
Basking sharks are the second-largest living shark species on our planet. Credit: Corbis/VCG/Getty

While the megalodon may remain extinct, the oceans continue to harbor awe-inspiring creatures like the basking shark, reminding us of the marvels - and dangers - that dwell beneath the waves.

Featured image credit: Cat Gennaro / Getty