What is Stiff Person Syndrome? As Celine Dion reveals heartbreaking diagnosis

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By VT

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Celine Dion today revealed she has been diagnosed with an incurable neurological condition, known as Stiff Person Syndrome.

In an emotional video posted to her Instagram, the Canadian singer said she has been forced to cancel all her upcoming tour dates following her diagnosis, which she says has impacted “every aspect of my daily life”.

Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) is a rare autoimmune and neurological disorder that causes rigidity in the torso and limbs.

“I’ve been dealing with problems with my health for a long time and it’s been really difficult for me to face my challenges and to talk about everything that I’ve been going through,” the singer admitted in a teary-eyed video.

Watch Dion's emotional address below:

“Recently I’ve been diagnosed with a very rare neurological disorder called the Stiff Person Syndrome which affects 1 in a million people.

“While we’re still learning about this rare condition, we now know this is what’s been causing all the spasms I’ve been having.”

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, SPS is characterized by "fluctuating muscle rigidity in the trunk and limbs and a heightened sensitivity to stimuli such as noise, touch, and emotional distress, which can set off muscle spasms...

"Abnormal postures, often hunched over and stiffened, are characteristic of the disorder. People with SPS can be too disabled to walk or move, or they are afraid to leave the house because street noises, such as the sound of a horn, can trigger spasms and falls."

size-large wp-image-1263182860
Credit: Tsuni / USA / Alamy

Following her diagnosis, the singer has been forced to cancel eight of her summer shows scheduled for 2023 and rescheduled her Spring 2023 shows to 2024.

“All I know is singing… I miss you so much,” she told fans in her video, recorded in both English and French.

“I always give 100 per cent when I do my shows but my condition is not allowing me to give that to you right now”.
She assured fans she had a “great team of doctors” working alongside her, and that she was working with a therapist ever day to build up the strength required to perform again.

"This is my focus and I'm doing everything that I can to recuperate,” she added.

“I want to thank you so much for your encouraging wishes of love and support on my social media. This means a lot to me.

“Take care of yourselves, be well. I love you guys so much. And I really hope I can see you again real soon."

Though the cause of SPS remains unknown, researchers at Yale Medicine suspect it may be the result of an autoimmune response gone awry in the brain and spinal cord, which causes the body to attack nerve cells in the central nervous system that control muscle movement.

Most people with SPS will start experiencing symptoms between the ages of 30 and 60, although women are twice as likely to be affected than men.

There is no cure for SPS. When doctors treat patients with the condition, they focus on relieving symptoms with medications such as muscle relaxants and steroids.

We wish Dion the very best at this time.

Featured image credit: Tsuni / USA / Alamy

What is Stiff Person Syndrome? As Celine Dion reveals heartbreaking diagnosis

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

Celine Dion today revealed she has been diagnosed with an incurable neurological condition, known as Stiff Person Syndrome.

In an emotional video posted to her Instagram, the Canadian singer said she has been forced to cancel all her upcoming tour dates following her diagnosis, which she says has impacted “every aspect of my daily life”.

Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) is a rare autoimmune and neurological disorder that causes rigidity in the torso and limbs.

“I’ve been dealing with problems with my health for a long time and it’s been really difficult for me to face my challenges and to talk about everything that I’ve been going through,” the singer admitted in a teary-eyed video.

Watch Dion's emotional address below:

“Recently I’ve been diagnosed with a very rare neurological disorder called the Stiff Person Syndrome which affects 1 in a million people.

“While we’re still learning about this rare condition, we now know this is what’s been causing all the spasms I’ve been having.”

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, SPS is characterized by "fluctuating muscle rigidity in the trunk and limbs and a heightened sensitivity to stimuli such as noise, touch, and emotional distress, which can set off muscle spasms...

"Abnormal postures, often hunched over and stiffened, are characteristic of the disorder. People with SPS can be too disabled to walk or move, or they are afraid to leave the house because street noises, such as the sound of a horn, can trigger spasms and falls."

size-large wp-image-1263182860
Credit: Tsuni / USA / Alamy

Following her diagnosis, the singer has been forced to cancel eight of her summer shows scheduled for 2023 and rescheduled her Spring 2023 shows to 2024.

“All I know is singing… I miss you so much,” she told fans in her video, recorded in both English and French.

“I always give 100 per cent when I do my shows but my condition is not allowing me to give that to you right now”.
She assured fans she had a “great team of doctors” working alongside her, and that she was working with a therapist ever day to build up the strength required to perform again.

"This is my focus and I'm doing everything that I can to recuperate,” she added.

“I want to thank you so much for your encouraging wishes of love and support on my social media. This means a lot to me.

“Take care of yourselves, be well. I love you guys so much. And I really hope I can see you again real soon."

Though the cause of SPS remains unknown, researchers at Yale Medicine suspect it may be the result of an autoimmune response gone awry in the brain and spinal cord, which causes the body to attack nerve cells in the central nervous system that control muscle movement.

Most people with SPS will start experiencing symptoms between the ages of 30 and 60, although women are twice as likely to be affected than men.

There is no cure for SPS. When doctors treat patients with the condition, they focus on relieving symptoms with medications such as muscle relaxants and steroids.

We wish Dion the very best at this time.

Featured image credit: Tsuni / USA / Alamy