Viewers call Netflix's new true crime docuseries one of the most 'heartbreaking' shows they've ever seen

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By stefan armitage

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Viewers of Netflix's latest true crime docuseries are calling it one of the most "heartbreaking" shows they've ever watched.

Landing on the streaming platform on November 2, Killer Sally details the story of female bodybuilder, who spent 24 years of her life behind bars for the murder of her husband and fellow bodybuilder, Ray McNeil.

Sally, a former US marine and mother of two, used a shotgun to fatally wound her husband on Valentine's Day 1995. Despite the fact he repeatedly claimed that she acted in self-defense, she was convicted of second-degree murder in March of the following year.

"I just shot my husband because he just beat me up," Sally says to the 911 operator moments after she shot Ray.

Check out the gripping trailer below:

The three-part series shares testimonies from Sally, her children, and those closest to her family. Sally insists that she had suffered years of abuse from her husband, with her children also recalling how their step-dad used to beat them.

Her son, John, says in the show: "He was like the devil to me."

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Credit: Netflix

"I remember how tortuous it used to be to have to sit there and watch him abuse my sister... and to know that I was next," John adds.

Sally, who married Ray in 1987, argued that she had a "right" to defend herself and that she "didn't want to die" at the hands of her husband. And throughout the three-part docuseries, viewers must decide if they can trust Sally's claims or believe that Ray's murder was premeditated.

The show also explores the effects of steroid abuse, the perception of muscular women in the public eye, and shows the moment jail surveillance cameras captured the moment Sally told her kids that they would have to go to a shelter as a result of her actions.

Following the show's debut on Netflix, viewers have taken to social media to share their thoughts on the docuseries.

"#KillerSally is one of the most heartbreaking documentaries I’ve watched," one Twitter user wrote, adding: "I don’t see a killer - I see a desperate woman protecting her family."

A second added: "Seeing Sally McNeil documentary #killersally and that interrogation room scene with her kids is so heartbreaking. No kid should have to go through that."

A third wrote: "I love documentaries. But, f**k.. this one really hit me. An outrageous and disgusting misjustice, a real and heartbreaking reflection of how domestic abuse can completely ripple through a family."

And columnist Karen Attiah tweeted: "I had never heard of the Sally McNeil story before #KillerSally doc. So much to unpack about society's attitudes towards abused women who aren't perfect victims...

"One thing is clear-- America heavily punishes women who use force to defend themselves against their abusers."

Despite the documentary being "heartbreaking" for some viewers - and the questions it has raised - Sally says she is only enjoying her newfound freedom.

Featured image credit: True Images / Alamy

Viewers call Netflix's new true crime docuseries one of the most 'heartbreaking' shows they've ever seen

vt-author-image

By stefan armitage

Article saved!Article saved!

Viewers of Netflix's latest true crime docuseries are calling it one of the most "heartbreaking" shows they've ever watched.

Landing on the streaming platform on November 2, Killer Sally details the story of female bodybuilder, who spent 24 years of her life behind bars for the murder of her husband and fellow bodybuilder, Ray McNeil.

Sally, a former US marine and mother of two, used a shotgun to fatally wound her husband on Valentine's Day 1995. Despite the fact he repeatedly claimed that she acted in self-defense, she was convicted of second-degree murder in March of the following year.

"I just shot my husband because he just beat me up," Sally says to the 911 operator moments after she shot Ray.

Check out the gripping trailer below:

The three-part series shares testimonies from Sally, her children, and those closest to her family. Sally insists that she had suffered years of abuse from her husband, with her children also recalling how their step-dad used to beat them.

Her son, John, says in the show: "He was like the devil to me."

size-large wp-image-1263176347
Credit: Netflix

"I remember how tortuous it used to be to have to sit there and watch him abuse my sister... and to know that I was next," John adds.

Sally, who married Ray in 1987, argued that she had a "right" to defend herself and that she "didn't want to die" at the hands of her husband. And throughout the three-part docuseries, viewers must decide if they can trust Sally's claims or believe that Ray's murder was premeditated.

The show also explores the effects of steroid abuse, the perception of muscular women in the public eye, and shows the moment jail surveillance cameras captured the moment Sally told her kids that they would have to go to a shelter as a result of her actions.

Following the show's debut on Netflix, viewers have taken to social media to share their thoughts on the docuseries.

"#KillerSally is one of the most heartbreaking documentaries I’ve watched," one Twitter user wrote, adding: "I don’t see a killer - I see a desperate woman protecting her family."

A second added: "Seeing Sally McNeil documentary #killersally and that interrogation room scene with her kids is so heartbreaking. No kid should have to go through that."

A third wrote: "I love documentaries. But, f**k.. this one really hit me. An outrageous and disgusting misjustice, a real and heartbreaking reflection of how domestic abuse can completely ripple through a family."

And columnist Karen Attiah tweeted: "I had never heard of the Sally McNeil story before #KillerSally doc. So much to unpack about society's attitudes towards abused women who aren't perfect victims...

"One thing is clear-- America heavily punishes women who use force to defend themselves against their abusers."

Despite the documentary being "heartbreaking" for some viewers - and the questions it has raised - Sally says she is only enjoying her newfound freedom.

Featured image credit: True Images / Alamy