Dad slammed for teaching his two-year-old son how to hunt: 'Get them started young'

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By Asiya Ali

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A dad has revealed how he is already teaching his two-year-old son how to hunt - but not everyone agrees with the activity.

Zach Williams, from Australia, is a father to a two-year-old son and a seven-year-old stepson. He is currently teaching his eldest how to shoot with a bow and arrow while his younger son watches.

The father spoke with news.com.au’s podcast I’ve Got News For You and disclosed that he takes his children hunting because he wants to share the adventures he had when he was growing up.

"I started hunting before I had any memory of going out. My grandparents used to take me out camping and fishing and hunting quite young so it’s just all I’ve known growing up," he told host Andrew Bucklow.

"I’ve got my stepson’s elbow and have wound down the poundage, which is the drawer weight and I’ve just started letting him shoot targets with help from myself," Zach said. "(My younger son) giggles, shoots the bow again, giggles and he’s like more please dad."

Watch a video of Williams and his son below:

Williams also takes his youngest son to explore nature that surrounds him, saying: "I want him to have fun out there, take notice of all the other things that’s going on."

"You see all the native animals, you see all the native bird life, you come across lizards, see plenty of kangaroos, emus, and stuff like that," he added.

Williams insisted that there there are educational factors behind teaching his children how to hunt that others don’t see. This includes "butchering" their meat, educating them on conservation, and the threats feral animals set on the environment.

The father also said that he doesn’t want his sons to harm animals just yet when they go hunting, because they don’t have the capacity to kill their prey in a "humane" way.

"You need a certain poundage to efficiently, effectively, and humanely kill something with a bow and arrow and that’s what you’re trying for when your bow hunting is the most humane shot possible," Williams said.

"So you have to get lots of practice in it and you also have to have the right setup, the right arrow. So it’s as clean a kill as possible," he added.

An MP for Australia's Animal Justice Party, Emma Hurst, opposes the activity and is concerned about the NSW government’s plans for existing hunting regulations that involve children.

Hurst told the podcast host that the bids - which include children being able to hunt with bows and dogs - should be discarded.

"These are absolutely shocking proposals being put forward by the Minister Agriculture Dugald Saunders, it completely ignores the significant safety risk of these weapons, and the enormous animal welfare impacts that they will have as well," she said.

The politician also said she is worried about the "traumatic experiences" children may get from hunting and heavily criticized parents like Williams.

However, Williams acknowledged that hunting can be confronting at first but said once his seven-year-old son discovered where meat comes from, he started to enjoy the activity.

"It’s time that we spend bonding together…and they’re learning that step of getting fresh meat in their freezer," he added.

Featured image credit: Buzz Pictures / Alamy

Dad slammed for teaching his two-year-old son how to hunt: 'Get them started young'

vt-author-image

By Asiya Ali

Article saved!Article saved!

A dad has revealed how he is already teaching his two-year-old son how to hunt - but not everyone agrees with the activity.

Zach Williams, from Australia, is a father to a two-year-old son and a seven-year-old stepson. He is currently teaching his eldest how to shoot with a bow and arrow while his younger son watches.

The father spoke with news.com.au’s podcast I’ve Got News For You and disclosed that he takes his children hunting because he wants to share the adventures he had when he was growing up.

"I started hunting before I had any memory of going out. My grandparents used to take me out camping and fishing and hunting quite young so it’s just all I’ve known growing up," he told host Andrew Bucklow.

"I’ve got my stepson’s elbow and have wound down the poundage, which is the drawer weight and I’ve just started letting him shoot targets with help from myself," Zach said. "(My younger son) giggles, shoots the bow again, giggles and he’s like more please dad."

Watch a video of Williams and his son below:

Williams also takes his youngest son to explore nature that surrounds him, saying: "I want him to have fun out there, take notice of all the other things that’s going on."

"You see all the native animals, you see all the native bird life, you come across lizards, see plenty of kangaroos, emus, and stuff like that," he added.

Williams insisted that there there are educational factors behind teaching his children how to hunt that others don’t see. This includes "butchering" their meat, educating them on conservation, and the threats feral animals set on the environment.

The father also said that he doesn’t want his sons to harm animals just yet when they go hunting, because they don’t have the capacity to kill their prey in a "humane" way.

"You need a certain poundage to efficiently, effectively, and humanely kill something with a bow and arrow and that’s what you’re trying for when your bow hunting is the most humane shot possible," Williams said.

"So you have to get lots of practice in it and you also have to have the right setup, the right arrow. So it’s as clean a kill as possible," he added.

An MP for Australia's Animal Justice Party, Emma Hurst, opposes the activity and is concerned about the NSW government’s plans for existing hunting regulations that involve children.

Hurst told the podcast host that the bids - which include children being able to hunt with bows and dogs - should be discarded.

"These are absolutely shocking proposals being put forward by the Minister Agriculture Dugald Saunders, it completely ignores the significant safety risk of these weapons, and the enormous animal welfare impacts that they will have as well," she said.

The politician also said she is worried about the "traumatic experiences" children may get from hunting and heavily criticized parents like Williams.

However, Williams acknowledged that hunting can be confronting at first but said once his seven-year-old son discovered where meat comes from, he started to enjoy the activity.

"It’s time that we spend bonding together…and they’re learning that step of getting fresh meat in their freezer," he added.

Featured image credit: Buzz Pictures / Alamy