Doctor reveals the age you should consider permanently cutting alcohol from your diet

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By Nasima Khatun

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A doctor has revealed at what age people should consider cutting alcohol out of their lives for good.

In our society, drinking seems to be a staple bonding activity but as health trends have gotten more and more popular over the past few years, many are now deciding to cut out booze from their lives in an attempt to reduce the long-term impacts of it.

Dr. Restak talks about the issue in his book How To Prevent Dementia, which was released back in January, making a strong link between the drink and the chances of getting the disease.

Referring to it as a "direct neurotoxin,” the expert stated that drinking regularly or in large amounts can actually be detrimental to one's health but especially the function of the brain.

GettyImages-643821051.jpgCredit: Henrik Sorensen/Getty

“Ask yourself, ‘why do I drink?’ If the answer is ‘because alcohol helps me to elevate my mood and lower my anxiety,’ you may be at some peril, and it’s probably best to stop altogether,” he wrote in his book, as per the Huffington Post.

He even went on to directly point out the age people should stop drinking if they want to halt the long-term impacts of it.

“I strongly suggest that if you are 65 years old or older, that you completely and permanently eliminate alcohol from your diet,” Dr. Restak said.

GettyImages-1445388023.jpgCredit: Skynesher/Getty

But why 65?

Not only can it increase your risk of getting dementia - most commonly Alzheimer's - but you can also damage your body's general agility, making you more prone to stumbling or falling.

“Alcohol should also be seen in the context of frequent falls among the elderly,” the doctor said.

“The death rates from falls is increasing, especially among elderly men,” he pointed out, adding that fatalities have jumped 30% between 2007-2016.

Falls are responsible for 70% of accidental deaths in those 70 or older.

GettyImages-2024912859.jpgCredit: Halfpoint Images / Getty

The doctor added that if “you are already afflicted with other contributors to falls, such as a decline in strength, muscle atrophy, balance issues, and the taking of medications. In that case, drinking alcohol may be especially dangerous.”

And if things weren't scary enough anyway, there's even a specific type of Alzheimer's connected with heavy drinking.

The condition, known as Korsakoff’s syndrome, is “marked by a severe loss of recent memory” and “results from the direct effect of alcohol on the brain,” as per Dr. Restak's book.

GettyImages-1414387494.jpgCredit: Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty

This is because thiamine, AKA vitamin B1 plays an essential role in the growth and functioning of the brain and those levels get reduced, which makes you more prone to instability.

That means “within an hour, a normally functioning heavy drinker may become confused, lose balance, stagger, and fall. Most affected is the memory for recent events,” the doctor said.

So maybe it's time to make Dry January a Dry February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, and December, yeah?

Sorted.

Featured Image Credit: SimpleImages/Getty

Doctor reveals the age you should consider permanently cutting alcohol from your diet

vt-author-image

By Nasima Khatun

Article saved!Article saved!

A doctor has revealed at what age people should consider cutting alcohol out of their lives for good.

In our society, drinking seems to be a staple bonding activity but as health trends have gotten more and more popular over the past few years, many are now deciding to cut out booze from their lives in an attempt to reduce the long-term impacts of it.

Dr. Restak talks about the issue in his book How To Prevent Dementia, which was released back in January, making a strong link between the drink and the chances of getting the disease.

Referring to it as a "direct neurotoxin,” the expert stated that drinking regularly or in large amounts can actually be detrimental to one's health but especially the function of the brain.

GettyImages-643821051.jpgCredit: Henrik Sorensen/Getty

“Ask yourself, ‘why do I drink?’ If the answer is ‘because alcohol helps me to elevate my mood and lower my anxiety,’ you may be at some peril, and it’s probably best to stop altogether,” he wrote in his book, as per the Huffington Post.

He even went on to directly point out the age people should stop drinking if they want to halt the long-term impacts of it.

“I strongly suggest that if you are 65 years old or older, that you completely and permanently eliminate alcohol from your diet,” Dr. Restak said.

GettyImages-1445388023.jpgCredit: Skynesher/Getty

But why 65?

Not only can it increase your risk of getting dementia - most commonly Alzheimer's - but you can also damage your body's general agility, making you more prone to stumbling or falling.

“Alcohol should also be seen in the context of frequent falls among the elderly,” the doctor said.

“The death rates from falls is increasing, especially among elderly men,” he pointed out, adding that fatalities have jumped 30% between 2007-2016.

Falls are responsible for 70% of accidental deaths in those 70 or older.

GettyImages-2024912859.jpgCredit: Halfpoint Images / Getty

The doctor added that if “you are already afflicted with other contributors to falls, such as a decline in strength, muscle atrophy, balance issues, and the taking of medications. In that case, drinking alcohol may be especially dangerous.”

And if things weren't scary enough anyway, there's even a specific type of Alzheimer's connected with heavy drinking.

The condition, known as Korsakoff’s syndrome, is “marked by a severe loss of recent memory” and “results from the direct effect of alcohol on the brain,” as per Dr. Restak's book.

GettyImages-1414387494.jpgCredit: Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty

This is because thiamine, AKA vitamin B1 plays an essential role in the growth and functioning of the brain and those levels get reduced, which makes you more prone to instability.

That means “within an hour, a normally functioning heavy drinker may become confused, lose balance, stagger, and fall. Most affected is the memory for recent events,” the doctor said.

So maybe it's time to make Dry January a Dry February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, and December, yeah?

Sorted.

Featured Image Credit: SimpleImages/Getty