People vow to never buy disposable vapes again after seeing how they’re made

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By Michelle H

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If you're a dedicated vaper, this video on the manufacturing process might be an eye-opener. In fact, a video on just that has had people vowing never to buy an e-cigarette again.

Vaping has surged in popularity, especially among young adults. A 2021 CDC report revealed that adults aged 18 to 24 were the most frequent users of e-cigarettes.

Meanwhile, nearly three million middle and high school students in the US admitted to currently using a tobacco product last year. As vaping becomes more common, so does the awareness of its health risks.

GettyImages-1990103815.jpgCredit: Peter Dazeley / Getty

For instance, one man was left with a mere one percent chance of survival after several years of vaping.

Vaping, often marketed as a safer alternative to traditional smoking, has raised significant health concerns in recent years. 

One major issue is the presence of harmful chemicals in e-cigarette liquids, including nicotine, which is highly addictive and can adversely affect brain development in adolescents. 

The vapor produced can contain toxic substances such as formaldehyde and acrolein, which are known to cause lung damage. 

There have also been numerous reports of severe respiratory problems, including cases of EVALI (e-cigarette or vaping-associated lung injury), which have led to hospitalizations and even deaths.

GettyImages-1491209517.jpgCredit: Peter Dazeley / Getty

And if hearing about health scares related to vaping isn't enough to deter you, perhaps a video showing how vapes are made will.

The 2022 video, which has amassed over 340,000 views, showcases the entire production process of one vape brand. The assembly line, in particular, has raised eyebrows.


One viewer commented: “You are telling me that they are touching the tips of the vape without any glove on?? Didn't they know that their hands release grease constantly soo imagine while working? Bruuuh I would not buy these lol I ain't looking to have a stranger fingerprint on my vape tips when I buy it.”

Another remarked: “Well, that doesn't look very appetizing, how they attach the mouthpieces without gloves, see 0:28. That was definitely the last one I bought after seeing that. (gag).”

Some viewers also criticized the environmental impact, with one writing: “What a wasteful product.”

While the external assembly of vape pens has left some viewers disgusted, the interior components haven't fared much better. 

A TikTok user shared a video tearing apart an e-cigarette, revealing a foam tube tinged orange from nicotine and the wires powering the device.

Vapes function by using a battery to heat a liquid with metal coils, transforming it into an aerosol for inhalation.

These coils can be made from various materials, including kanthal (an alloy of iron, chromium, and aluminum) or a nickel-chromium blend. Some studies have suggested that vapes may expose users to toxic metals.

Featured image credit: Peter Dazeley / Getty

People vow to never buy disposable vapes again after seeing how they’re made

vt-author-image

By Michelle H

Article saved!Article saved!

If you're a dedicated vaper, this video on the manufacturing process might be an eye-opener. In fact, a video on just that has had people vowing never to buy an e-cigarette again.

Vaping has surged in popularity, especially among young adults. A 2021 CDC report revealed that adults aged 18 to 24 were the most frequent users of e-cigarettes.

Meanwhile, nearly three million middle and high school students in the US admitted to currently using a tobacco product last year. As vaping becomes more common, so does the awareness of its health risks.

GettyImages-1990103815.jpgCredit: Peter Dazeley / Getty

For instance, one man was left with a mere one percent chance of survival after several years of vaping.

Vaping, often marketed as a safer alternative to traditional smoking, has raised significant health concerns in recent years. 

One major issue is the presence of harmful chemicals in e-cigarette liquids, including nicotine, which is highly addictive and can adversely affect brain development in adolescents. 

The vapor produced can contain toxic substances such as formaldehyde and acrolein, which are known to cause lung damage. 

There have also been numerous reports of severe respiratory problems, including cases of EVALI (e-cigarette or vaping-associated lung injury), which have led to hospitalizations and even deaths.

GettyImages-1491209517.jpgCredit: Peter Dazeley / Getty

And if hearing about health scares related to vaping isn't enough to deter you, perhaps a video showing how vapes are made will.

The 2022 video, which has amassed over 340,000 views, showcases the entire production process of one vape brand. The assembly line, in particular, has raised eyebrows.


One viewer commented: “You are telling me that they are touching the tips of the vape without any glove on?? Didn't they know that their hands release grease constantly soo imagine while working? Bruuuh I would not buy these lol I ain't looking to have a stranger fingerprint on my vape tips when I buy it.”

Another remarked: “Well, that doesn't look very appetizing, how they attach the mouthpieces without gloves, see 0:28. That was definitely the last one I bought after seeing that. (gag).”

Some viewers also criticized the environmental impact, with one writing: “What a wasteful product.”

While the external assembly of vape pens has left some viewers disgusted, the interior components haven't fared much better. 

A TikTok user shared a video tearing apart an e-cigarette, revealing a foam tube tinged orange from nicotine and the wires powering the device.

Vapes function by using a battery to heat a liquid with metal coils, transforming it into an aerosol for inhalation.

These coils can be made from various materials, including kanthal (an alloy of iron, chromium, and aluminum) or a nickel-chromium blend. Some studies have suggested that vapes may expose users to toxic metals.

Featured image credit: Peter Dazeley / Getty