KFC's plant-based chicken sells out in Canada in under 24 hours

KFC's plant-based chicken sells out in Canada in under 24 hours

World-famous fast-food franchise KFC has taken the next step in their bid to conquer the world of animal-free cookery with the news that their Canadian plant-based chicken trial sold out in under 24 hours.

The promotion, which was created in collaboration with plant-based protein producers “Lightlife”, proved incredibly popular with customers in Mississauga, with supplies vanishing before the day was out. 

The offer was originally intended to run from 10:30 AM until 11:00 PM at the KFC at 6055 Creditview Rd. in Mississauga. However, according to a report in Plant Based News, the branch never made it to the 11:00 PM deadline, selling out of stock long before.

The stunt itself showcased two new creations from KFC in the form of a plant-based chicken sandwich for $6.99 (or $8.99 if bought as part of a meal) and popcorn chicken for $3.99. Updating their fans on social media as the day unfolded, Lightlife eventually confirmed the news that no more “chicken” was available over Instagram, writing: 

“And just like that, we're all sold out! Stay tuned for more chances to try our Plant-Based Fried Chicken at @KFC_Canada.”

This was soon corroborated by KFC, who added on Twitter:

“That was finger lickin’ good while it lasted. Our Plant-Based Fried Chicken by @Lightlife is sold out, but stay tuned for its return. #KentuckyFriedMiracle.”

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Eagle-eyed KFC fans will note that this isn’t the first time that the chain has dipped a toe into the plant-based market. Earlier this year, a franchise in Atlanta sold out of faux chicken by “Beyond Meat” in less than five hours, proving that there’s an appetite for the alternative both north and south of the border. 

It’s not just KFC’s meat that is getting an environmentally friendly makeover. Multiple media outlets have also reported that the company is trialling “bamboo” chicken buckets in a bid to aid recycling efforts. This, together with tentative plant-based chicken trials, suggests that KFC could be heading in a very different direction in the next few years.

This article originally appeared on TwistedFood.co.uk