Man sailing the Pacific Ocean solo shares the startling moment his sailboat is surrounded by countless ‘False Killer Whales’

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By stefan armitage

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A guy who is currently on a solo sailing trip in the Pacific Ocean is currently leaving social media users amazed with his videos.

Luke, who goes by "Sailing Songbird" on TikTok, uses the social media platform to share videos of his life after giving up his career as a teacher. The content creator used to teach music at Washington Middle School in Seattle before giving up his career to follow his dreams.

Some of his recent videos show him revealing his sleeping conditions on the 27ft sailboat and his terrifying paddleboard trip to the middle of absolutely nowhere.

As the solo sailer navigates French Polynesia, he's amassed over 900,000 followers on TikTok alone showing how he survives at sea all alone with nothing but the sky on the horizon.

Well, I say alone... but Luke recently took to the platform to share an incredible video of the moment his sailboat was surrounding by countless sea creatures.


He captioned the video: "Does anyone know what these are?? It was amazing to see them after being on my own for so long."

Sharing the incredible - but simultaneously terrifying - view of black dorsal fin after black dorsal fin emerge from the waters, Luke said: "It's day 27 of sailing the Pacific Ocean alone, and I've got company.

"I am in the largest storm I have in on passage, and I think that these are porpoises. Um, they are something in between a dolphin and a killer whale."

Funnily enough, Luke was pretty spot on with that description, as a marine biologist took to the comments section to reveal that the creatures were actually false killer whales - a species of oceanic dolphin often found in tropical waters. (Others assumed they could be pilot whales, but I'm going to side with the marine biologist on this one.)

"There's so many of them," Luke gushes, "Oh my!"

I won't lie, as incredible as the sight must have been, it's also my idea of a living nightmare. Being out at sea, miles away from any land, and - all of a sudden - dozens upon dozens of giant sea beasts surround your boat with their dorsal fins sticking out of the waters.

No thank you.

GettyImages-1158802274.jpgA pod of False Killer Whales. Credit: Romona Robbins Photography / Getty

After amassing more than 11 million views, followers flooded the comments section with their thoughts, with one person writing: "They’re your family now. Don’t go back to land."

"[You] need a bigger boat it’s giving me anxiety," a second commented.

And a third added: "This looks so cool and peaceful...and then I remember you're ALONE and perspective changes to cold and scary."

This isn't the first time Luke has left social media aghast.

In a previous video, he ventured away from his sailboat in what I can only describe as the loneliest paddleboat session of all time. Seriously, just check out his Google Maps location:


Adventures like Luke's certainly are incredible - but I'll stick to channel surfing on my sofa for now.

Featured image credit: Romona Robbins Photography / Getty

Man sailing the Pacific Ocean solo shares the startling moment his sailboat is surrounded by countless ‘False Killer Whales’

vt-author-image

By stefan armitage

Article saved!Article saved!

A guy who is currently on a solo sailing trip in the Pacific Ocean is currently leaving social media users amazed with his videos.

Luke, who goes by "Sailing Songbird" on TikTok, uses the social media platform to share videos of his life after giving up his career as a teacher. The content creator used to teach music at Washington Middle School in Seattle before giving up his career to follow his dreams.

Some of his recent videos show him revealing his sleeping conditions on the 27ft sailboat and his terrifying paddleboard trip to the middle of absolutely nowhere.

As the solo sailer navigates French Polynesia, he's amassed over 900,000 followers on TikTok alone showing how he survives at sea all alone with nothing but the sky on the horizon.

Well, I say alone... but Luke recently took to the platform to share an incredible video of the moment his sailboat was surrounding by countless sea creatures.


He captioned the video: "Does anyone know what these are?? It was amazing to see them after being on my own for so long."

Sharing the incredible - but simultaneously terrifying - view of black dorsal fin after black dorsal fin emerge from the waters, Luke said: "It's day 27 of sailing the Pacific Ocean alone, and I've got company.

"I am in the largest storm I have in on passage, and I think that these are porpoises. Um, they are something in between a dolphin and a killer whale."

Funnily enough, Luke was pretty spot on with that description, as a marine biologist took to the comments section to reveal that the creatures were actually false killer whales - a species of oceanic dolphin often found in tropical waters. (Others assumed they could be pilot whales, but I'm going to side with the marine biologist on this one.)

"There's so many of them," Luke gushes, "Oh my!"

I won't lie, as incredible as the sight must have been, it's also my idea of a living nightmare. Being out at sea, miles away from any land, and - all of a sudden - dozens upon dozens of giant sea beasts surround your boat with their dorsal fins sticking out of the waters.

No thank you.

GettyImages-1158802274.jpgA pod of False Killer Whales. Credit: Romona Robbins Photography / Getty

After amassing more than 11 million views, followers flooded the comments section with their thoughts, with one person writing: "They’re your family now. Don’t go back to land."

"[You] need a bigger boat it’s giving me anxiety," a second commented.

And a third added: "This looks so cool and peaceful...and then I remember you're ALONE and perspective changes to cold and scary."

This isn't the first time Luke has left social media aghast.

In a previous video, he ventured away from his sailboat in what I can only describe as the loneliest paddleboat session of all time. Seriously, just check out his Google Maps location:


Adventures like Luke's certainly are incredible - but I'll stick to channel surfing on my sofa for now.

Featured image credit: Romona Robbins Photography / Getty