Louisiana mom and daughter charged after video of 'dog training' techniques go viral online

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By Phoebe Egoroff

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A mom and her daughter were recently slapped with animal cruelty charges after their dog training video went viral online.

Tina Frey, 52, and her 21-year-old daughter Victoria Brimer own and operate a dog training center in Louisiana. They're both now facing two counts of aggravated cruelty to animals, the Rapides Parish Sheriff's Office said in a statement on Facebook.

Per the release, the video in question allegedly depicted one of the women hitting a Cane Corso dog on the head with a riding crop. After receiving multiple complaints about the video, the Rapides Parish Sheriff's Office began its investigation.

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Credit: Rapides Parish Sheriff's Office

After verifying the identities of Frey and her daughter, the police charged them with two counts of Aggravated Cruelty to Animals.

People reported that the pair were released on $100,000 bail, but police stated it is "still a very active and ongoing investigation," and that it is possible there may be further charges as the investigation progresses.

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The video allegedly depicted one of the women hitting a Cane Corso dog on the head with a riding crop. Credit: Mark J. Barrett / Alamy

However, Brad Drell - the attorney for Tina Frey - has maintained that his client is innocent, telling People: "I want to unequivocally state that Tina Frey has never hurt or injured a dog in her care. She is a respected dog trainer and is qualified to train other trainers."

Drell also stated that Frey was an "expert" with Cane Corso dogs, before adding that the breed can be dangerous when not trained properly.

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An attorney for one of the suspects stated that his client was an "expert" with the Cane Corso breed. Credit: Craig Prentis Photography / Alamy

The lawyer claimed that the dog in the training video was not in pain, stating: "The video circulating of Ms. Frey using a squirt [a short whip] on [the dog called] Fenixx creates a false impression that dogs are being injured [...] While the squirt makes some noise, it is flexible and not painful.

"While I understand that many people feel, and some quite strongly, that the use of the squirt is not what they would do to correct a dog, the use of the squirt is not inhumane under the law. Fenixx was in no way injured, as is shown in the video."

Frey's attorney also stated that his client used the squirt on herself to demonstrate that she was "experiencing no pain."

The Rapides Parish Sheriff's office seemed satisfied with the arrests, with Sheriff Mark Wood stating on Facebook: "I want to thank the public for bearing with us while we conducted a complete and thorough investigation into these allegations [...] I would also like to commend our Animal Control Section and our detectives in their investigation of this incident and to staying the course, following the evidence where it leads and not bending to pressure of a quick arrest."

"We always take these animal complaints seriously as we do all crimes, but we also have to investigate, and make sure the alleged crime fits the law," the Sheriff concluded.

Featured image credit: Craig Prentis Photography / Alamy

Louisiana mom and daughter charged after video of 'dog training' techniques go viral online

vt-author-image

By Phoebe Egoroff

Article saved!Article saved!

A mom and her daughter were recently slapped with animal cruelty charges after their dog training video went viral online.

Tina Frey, 52, and her 21-year-old daughter Victoria Brimer own and operate a dog training center in Louisiana. They're both now facing two counts of aggravated cruelty to animals, the Rapides Parish Sheriff's Office said in a statement on Facebook.

Per the release, the video in question allegedly depicted one of the women hitting a Cane Corso dog on the head with a riding crop. After receiving multiple complaints about the video, the Rapides Parish Sheriff's Office began its investigation.

size-large wp-image-1263166160
Credit: Rapides Parish Sheriff's Office

After verifying the identities of Frey and her daughter, the police charged them with two counts of Aggravated Cruelty to Animals.

People reported that the pair were released on $100,000 bail, but police stated it is "still a very active and ongoing investigation," and that it is possible there may be further charges as the investigation progresses.

wp-image-1263166094 size-full
The video allegedly depicted one of the women hitting a Cane Corso dog on the head with a riding crop. Credit: Mark J. Barrett / Alamy

However, Brad Drell - the attorney for Tina Frey - has maintained that his client is innocent, telling People: "I want to unequivocally state that Tina Frey has never hurt or injured a dog in her care. She is a respected dog trainer and is qualified to train other trainers."

Drell also stated that Frey was an "expert" with Cane Corso dogs, before adding that the breed can be dangerous when not trained properly.

wp-image-1263166097 size-full
An attorney for one of the suspects stated that his client was an "expert" with the Cane Corso breed. Credit: Craig Prentis Photography / Alamy

The lawyer claimed that the dog in the training video was not in pain, stating: "The video circulating of Ms. Frey using a squirt [a short whip] on [the dog called] Fenixx creates a false impression that dogs are being injured [...] While the squirt makes some noise, it is flexible and not painful.

"While I understand that many people feel, and some quite strongly, that the use of the squirt is not what they would do to correct a dog, the use of the squirt is not inhumane under the law. Fenixx was in no way injured, as is shown in the video."

Frey's attorney also stated that his client used the squirt on herself to demonstrate that she was "experiencing no pain."

The Rapides Parish Sheriff's office seemed satisfied with the arrests, with Sheriff Mark Wood stating on Facebook: "I want to thank the public for bearing with us while we conducted a complete and thorough investigation into these allegations [...] I would also like to commend our Animal Control Section and our detectives in their investigation of this incident and to staying the course, following the evidence where it leads and not bending to pressure of a quick arrest."

"We always take these animal complaints seriously as we do all crimes, but we also have to investigate, and make sure the alleged crime fits the law," the Sheriff concluded.

Featured image credit: Craig Prentis Photography / Alamy