Nicola Bulley inquest sheds light on mom-of-two's final moments

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

The inquest into the tragic Nicola Bulley case that sparked widespread interest earlier this year has shed light on the circumstances surrounding the mother of two's death.

Recent details suggest she might have started drowning within "seconds" of entering the river where her body was ultimately found. This shocking revelation came to light during the ongoing inquest into her death.

Drowning expert, Professor Michael Tipton, indicated a "fairly rapid incapacitation" could have occurred within seconds once Bulley went into the icy River Wyre on the morning of January 27, Sky News reports.

Professor Tipton, supporting the autopsy conducted by Home Office pathologist Alison Armour, agreed that Bulley's death was indeed caused by drowning. Armour's examination revealed water present in the stomach and lungs, consistent with a "gasp response," a symptom seen in two-thirds of drowning victims.

Bulley had disappeared under mysterious circumstances after her usual morning routine of dropping her daughters, aged six and nine, off at school and walking her dog along the river in St Michael's, Lancashire, UK.

size-full wp-image-1263217836
Credit: Christopher Furlong / Getty

An alarming find was her cell phone, still linked to a work Teams call, which was abandoned on a bench overlooking the water. Her body was discovered in the river approximately a mile downstream from the bench on February 19.

Professor Tipton further expanded on his theory, stating: "On the balance of probability, there was a fairly rapid incapacitation due to the cold shock." The inquest learned that an estimated "20 to 30 seconds" was potentially all the time it took for Bulley to lose consciousness.

"We estimate the temperature would have been around 3 to 5C [in the River Wyre], so there would be a particularly powerful cold-shock response," Professor Tipton added: "For somebody of Nicola’s size, it would have taken one or two breaths in of water to be a lethal dose."

Cold water expert, Dr Patrick Morgan, explained the fatal effects of such an icy plunge on the human body, saying: "The heart pumps no blood and the brain switches off."

"On the occasion that the individual has taken that initial gasp on the surface of the water and then gone below, the duration would be 10 seconds that you could hold your breath, and very likely one or two seconds at best," Morgan added.

A police underwater search specialist believes Bulley likely fell into the river before drifting downstream to the location where her body was later found. Video evidence was presented showing the steep incline from the bench leading into the water.

Pathologist Alison Armour, confirming the cause of death as drowning, stated: "In my opinion, Nicola Bulley was alive when she entered the water." Her findings did not suggest any "third-party" involvement.

Family and friends of Bulley are still seeking answers, among them her partner Paul Ansell, her sister Louise Cunningham, and parents Ernest and Dot Bulley, who were present at the inquest.

The circumstances of Bulley's disappearance sparked a significant police search operation, which involved hundreds of local volunteers and intense public interest. Despite this, many have criticized the police's handling of the situation, leading to an official investigation.

The senior coroner for Lancashire, Dr James Adeley, addressed the social media controversy surrounding Bulley’s death before the inquest commenced, reminding those present that the focus should be on the devastating loss suffered by her family.

The inquest into the case is set to continue.

Featured image credit: Christopher Furlong / Getty

Nicola Bulley inquest sheds light on mom-of-two's final moments

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

The inquest into the tragic Nicola Bulley case that sparked widespread interest earlier this year has shed light on the circumstances surrounding the mother of two's death.

Recent details suggest she might have started drowning within "seconds" of entering the river where her body was ultimately found. This shocking revelation came to light during the ongoing inquest into her death.

Drowning expert, Professor Michael Tipton, indicated a "fairly rapid incapacitation" could have occurred within seconds once Bulley went into the icy River Wyre on the morning of January 27, Sky News reports.

Professor Tipton, supporting the autopsy conducted by Home Office pathologist Alison Armour, agreed that Bulley's death was indeed caused by drowning. Armour's examination revealed water present in the stomach and lungs, consistent with a "gasp response," a symptom seen in two-thirds of drowning victims.

Bulley had disappeared under mysterious circumstances after her usual morning routine of dropping her daughters, aged six and nine, off at school and walking her dog along the river in St Michael's, Lancashire, UK.

size-full wp-image-1263217836
Credit: Christopher Furlong / Getty

An alarming find was her cell phone, still linked to a work Teams call, which was abandoned on a bench overlooking the water. Her body was discovered in the river approximately a mile downstream from the bench on February 19.

Professor Tipton further expanded on his theory, stating: "On the balance of probability, there was a fairly rapid incapacitation due to the cold shock." The inquest learned that an estimated "20 to 30 seconds" was potentially all the time it took for Bulley to lose consciousness.

"We estimate the temperature would have been around 3 to 5C [in the River Wyre], so there would be a particularly powerful cold-shock response," Professor Tipton added: "For somebody of Nicola’s size, it would have taken one or two breaths in of water to be a lethal dose."

Cold water expert, Dr Patrick Morgan, explained the fatal effects of such an icy plunge on the human body, saying: "The heart pumps no blood and the brain switches off."

"On the occasion that the individual has taken that initial gasp on the surface of the water and then gone below, the duration would be 10 seconds that you could hold your breath, and very likely one or two seconds at best," Morgan added.

A police underwater search specialist believes Bulley likely fell into the river before drifting downstream to the location where her body was later found. Video evidence was presented showing the steep incline from the bench leading into the water.

Pathologist Alison Armour, confirming the cause of death as drowning, stated: "In my opinion, Nicola Bulley was alive when she entered the water." Her findings did not suggest any "third-party" involvement.

Family and friends of Bulley are still seeking answers, among them her partner Paul Ansell, her sister Louise Cunningham, and parents Ernest and Dot Bulley, who were present at the inquest.

The circumstances of Bulley's disappearance sparked a significant police search operation, which involved hundreds of local volunteers and intense public interest. Despite this, many have criticized the police's handling of the situation, leading to an official investigation.

The senior coroner for Lancashire, Dr James Adeley, addressed the social media controversy surrounding Bulley’s death before the inquest commenced, reminding those present that the focus should be on the devastating loss suffered by her family.

The inquest into the case is set to continue.

Featured image credit: Christopher Furlong / Getty