Maya Kowalski's mom sent a heartbreaking final email to her family

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By VT

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Warning: This article addresses topics that might be distressing for some.

Netflix's latest documentary, Take Care of Maya, has provoked outrage among viewers. In fact, it's being labeled one of the most distressing viewers have encountered recently.

The documentary delves into the harrowing ordeal of parents Jack and Beata Kowalski and their 10-year-old daughter, Maya - an ordeal that has driven viewers to tears.

At the heart of this heartbreaking story is the last email sent by Beata to her family and friends before her tragic death.

Maya's heartbreaking health journey began when she was only nine. She was faced with some severe health issues - chronic pain, asthma attacks, headaches, body lesions, and crippling foot cramps.

When she was diagnosed with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) in 2015, there was hope that Dr. Anthony Kirkpatrick's treatment plan would take away her suffering. He prescribed a high dose of ketamine, and when it failed to alleviate Maya's pain, suggested a five-day 'ketamine coma' to reboot her nervous system.

This led the Kowalskis to Mexico in search of answers. However, the glimmer of hope was short-lived, as Maya's condition worsened in October 2016.

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Credit: Netflix

Maya's poor health led her parents to the Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg, Florida. But things took an unimaginable turn when Beata, a registered nurse, was accused of medically abusing her daughter, only ten at the time.

Hospital staff proposed that Beata suffered from Munchausen by proxy (MSP), a condition where a caregiver fabricates or induces medical symptoms in a child. Despite a psychological evaluation that disproved this claim, Beata was barred from visiting Maya.

Maya, now 17, spent three months in state custody. Beata sadly took her life in January 2017, after 87 days of living without her daughter.

Netflix's synopsis of Take Care of Maya emphasizes the film's impact: "As the medical team tried to understand her rare illness, they began to question the basic truths that bound the Kowalskis together... The story of the Kowalski family - as told in their own words - will change the way you look at children’s healthcare forever."

Beata's email, discovered after her passing, reads: "Please take care of Maya and tell her how much I love her every day. I'm sorry but I no longer can take the pain being away from Maya and being treated like a criminal. I cannot watch my daughter suffer in pain and keep getting worse."

In the aftermath of this tragedy, the Kowalski family is now suing Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital for $220 million. The lawsuit, filed by AndersonGlenn LLP, has a trial date set for September this year.

In a recent interview with People, Maya provided an update on her health. The 17-year-old has regained full use of her limbs but still grapples with pain. "I do my best to push through," Maya affirmed. "I’ve already missed a lot, so I want to make the most of life now."

You can now stream Take Care of Maya on Netflix.

If you or someone you know is struggling or in crisis, help is available. Call or text 988 or chat 988lifeline.org 

Featured image credit: Erik Tanner / Getty

Maya Kowalski's mom sent a heartbreaking final email to her family

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!
Warning: This article addresses topics that might be distressing for some.

Netflix's latest documentary, Take Care of Maya, has provoked outrage among viewers. In fact, it's being labeled one of the most distressing viewers have encountered recently.

The documentary delves into the harrowing ordeal of parents Jack and Beata Kowalski and their 10-year-old daughter, Maya - an ordeal that has driven viewers to tears.

At the heart of this heartbreaking story is the last email sent by Beata to her family and friends before her tragic death.

Maya's heartbreaking health journey began when she was only nine. She was faced with some severe health issues - chronic pain, asthma attacks, headaches, body lesions, and crippling foot cramps.

When she was diagnosed with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) in 2015, there was hope that Dr. Anthony Kirkpatrick's treatment plan would take away her suffering. He prescribed a high dose of ketamine, and when it failed to alleviate Maya's pain, suggested a five-day 'ketamine coma' to reboot her nervous system.

This led the Kowalskis to Mexico in search of answers. However, the glimmer of hope was short-lived, as Maya's condition worsened in October 2016.

size-full wp-image-1263218301
Credit: Netflix

Maya's poor health led her parents to the Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg, Florida. But things took an unimaginable turn when Beata, a registered nurse, was accused of medically abusing her daughter, only ten at the time.

Hospital staff proposed that Beata suffered from Munchausen by proxy (MSP), a condition where a caregiver fabricates or induces medical symptoms in a child. Despite a psychological evaluation that disproved this claim, Beata was barred from visiting Maya.

Maya, now 17, spent three months in state custody. Beata sadly took her life in January 2017, after 87 days of living without her daughter.

Netflix's synopsis of Take Care of Maya emphasizes the film's impact: "As the medical team tried to understand her rare illness, they began to question the basic truths that bound the Kowalskis together... The story of the Kowalski family - as told in their own words - will change the way you look at children’s healthcare forever."

Beata's email, discovered after her passing, reads: "Please take care of Maya and tell her how much I love her every day. I'm sorry but I no longer can take the pain being away from Maya and being treated like a criminal. I cannot watch my daughter suffer in pain and keep getting worse."

In the aftermath of this tragedy, the Kowalski family is now suing Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital for $220 million. The lawsuit, filed by AndersonGlenn LLP, has a trial date set for September this year.

In a recent interview with People, Maya provided an update on her health. The 17-year-old has regained full use of her limbs but still grapples with pain. "I do my best to push through," Maya affirmed. "I’ve already missed a lot, so I want to make the most of life now."

You can now stream Take Care of Maya on Netflix.

If you or someone you know is struggling or in crisis, help is available. Call or text 988 or chat 988lifeline.org 

Featured image credit: Erik Tanner / Getty