Riley Strain's cause of death confirmed after autopsy

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By Michelle H

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Riley Strain's cause of death has been confirmed after an autopsy was completed.

The young man's body was found on Friday (March 22), weeks after he disappeared when he was kicked out of a honky-tonk bar.

Metropolitan Nashville Police wrote on X (formerly Twitter): "The body of Riley Strain was recovered from the Cumberland River in West Nashville this morning, approximately 8 miles from downtown."

They added at the time that "no foul play-related trauma was observed," but that "an autopsy is pending."

The University of Missouri student vanished moments before 10PM on March 8 after he was told by staff to leave the Nashville bar and became separated from his friends.

Screenshot-2024-03-21-at-12.51.39.pngThe young man's body was found on Friday (March 22), weeks after he disappeared when he was kicked out of a honky-tonk bar. Credit: Metropolitan Nashville Police Department

The 6'7" finance major was last captured on surveillance footage roaming the city streets after leaving the bar.

Despite search efforts, the 22-year-old remained missing for weeks, with only his bank card initially having been found near the Cumberland River in Nashville more than a week after he was last seen.

Now, documents have revealed that Riley's tragic death was caused by drowning and ethanol intoxication, with the manner of death deemed accidental, TMZ reports.

The report also divulged his blood alcohol concentration at the time of examination, noting a high level of 0.228. Importantly, the autopsy found no significant trauma to Riley's body, which might bring some solace to his family. Additionally, traces of THC were detected in his system.

The documents further detail that Riley's body was discovered in the Cumberland River in Nashville by an employee at a concrete plant on March 22, several days after he was reported missing.

Screenshot-2024-03-22-at-15.25.14.jpgCredit: Metropolitan Nashville Police Department

This revelation provides some much-needed closure for his devastated family, who have been searching for answers for months following his untimely death.

The preliminary autopsy (released in March) stated Strain's death was "accidental" with no foul play.

His loved ones have since thanked the Nashville community.

“I want to reiterate how thankful we are for everyone and how much we appreciate everyone’s support, love and prayers,” Strain’s mother, Michelle Whiteid, said, per WKRN.

“We are quite thankful for everything you’ve done — the grace you’ve given us,” Chris Whiteid, Strain’s stepfather, said.

The preliminary autopsy comes after family friend Chris Dingman revealed the last text message the then missing student sent.

He told NewsNation that Strain had sent a puzzling message to a girl he was speaking to who “texted him to see how he was doing”. Strain is said to have responded: “Good lops.”

Our thoughts are with Strain's loved ones.

Featured image credit: Metropolitan Nashville Police Department

Riley Strain's cause of death confirmed after autopsy

vt-author-image

By Michelle H

Article saved!Article saved!

Riley Strain's cause of death has been confirmed after an autopsy was completed.

The young man's body was found on Friday (March 22), weeks after he disappeared when he was kicked out of a honky-tonk bar.

Metropolitan Nashville Police wrote on X (formerly Twitter): "The body of Riley Strain was recovered from the Cumberland River in West Nashville this morning, approximately 8 miles from downtown."

They added at the time that "no foul play-related trauma was observed," but that "an autopsy is pending."

The University of Missouri student vanished moments before 10PM on March 8 after he was told by staff to leave the Nashville bar and became separated from his friends.

Screenshot-2024-03-21-at-12.51.39.pngThe young man's body was found on Friday (March 22), weeks after he disappeared when he was kicked out of a honky-tonk bar. Credit: Metropolitan Nashville Police Department

The 6'7" finance major was last captured on surveillance footage roaming the city streets after leaving the bar.

Despite search efforts, the 22-year-old remained missing for weeks, with only his bank card initially having been found near the Cumberland River in Nashville more than a week after he was last seen.

Now, documents have revealed that Riley's tragic death was caused by drowning and ethanol intoxication, with the manner of death deemed accidental, TMZ reports.

The report also divulged his blood alcohol concentration at the time of examination, noting a high level of 0.228. Importantly, the autopsy found no significant trauma to Riley's body, which might bring some solace to his family. Additionally, traces of THC were detected in his system.

The documents further detail that Riley's body was discovered in the Cumberland River in Nashville by an employee at a concrete plant on March 22, several days after he was reported missing.

Screenshot-2024-03-22-at-15.25.14.jpgCredit: Metropolitan Nashville Police Department

This revelation provides some much-needed closure for his devastated family, who have been searching for answers for months following his untimely death.

The preliminary autopsy (released in March) stated Strain's death was "accidental" with no foul play.

His loved ones have since thanked the Nashville community.

“I want to reiterate how thankful we are for everyone and how much we appreciate everyone’s support, love and prayers,” Strain’s mother, Michelle Whiteid, said, per WKRN.

“We are quite thankful for everything you’ve done — the grace you’ve given us,” Chris Whiteid, Strain’s stepfather, said.

The preliminary autopsy comes after family friend Chris Dingman revealed the last text message the then missing student sent.

He told NewsNation that Strain had sent a puzzling message to a girl he was speaking to who “texted him to see how he was doing”. Strain is said to have responded: “Good lops.”

Our thoughts are with Strain's loved ones.

Featured image credit: Metropolitan Nashville Police Department