Couple demand refund after 'snorting' dog leaves 'saliva goo' on husband's leg during 13-hour flight

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

A couple are demanding a refund after sharing their 13-hour flight with a rather flatulent emotional support dog.

Gill and Warren Press were flying from Paris to Singapore on Singapore Airlines, en route to their final destination in New Zealand, when they discovered their close-quarters neighbor wasn't human.

They had shelled out for luxury premium economy seats, hoping for a comfortable, relaxing journey, but what they got was an experience that was anything but tranquil.

The dog, which was serving as an emotional support animal for another passenger, was seated far too close for their comfort and raised quite the ruckus—or should we say barkus—with its noises.

Mrs. Press spoke candidly with Stuff magazine about what had happened, recounting, "I heard this noise—a heavy snorting. I thought it was my husband’s phone, but we looked down and realized it was the dog breathing. I said, ‘I’m not having this sitting next to us the whole trip’."

But that was not all. According to Press, "They couldn’t have the dog out in the aisle because they couldn’t get the trolleys through, so it had to come in further, which meant his head was under my husband’s feet. My husband was in shorts, and was getting the dog’s saliva goo on his leg."

wp-image-1263228156 size-full
Credit: NurPhoto / Getty

The final straw was when the dog started farting. Upon asking for alternative seating, they were told that the only available seats were those usually reserved for cabin crew.

The couple later contacted Singapore Airlines, which initially told them the incident would be logged. It was only after the couple logged a formal complaint themselves that they received $120 travel vouchers each. However, they remain dissatisfied, insisting that the vouchers do not make up for the "experience they paid for."

Singapore Airlines released an official statement to The Independent, acknowledging the incident: "Singapore Airlines endeavours to notify customers who may be seated next to an assistance dog prior to boarding the flight. We sincerely apologize that this did not occur in this case, and will work with our airport teams to ensure that this lapse does not occur in future.

"In circumstances where customers seated next to an assistance dog request to be moved, Singapore Airlines will assist to re-seat customers within the same cabin where space permits."

The story serves as a cautionary tale and opens up a wider debate about in-flight etiquette, passenger comfort, and the rights of those traveling with emotional support animals. It’s clear that while airlines strive for customer satisfaction (or at least, should do), this is one flight that neither the couple nor the dog's owner will soon forget.

As the story gains traction online, it also offers airlines a moment to pause and consider the ever-growing complexity of ensuring a pleasant experience for all passengers in today's crowded skies.

Featured image credit: Bruce Bennett / Getty

Couple demand refund after 'snorting' dog leaves 'saliva goo' on husband's leg during 13-hour flight

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

A couple are demanding a refund after sharing their 13-hour flight with a rather flatulent emotional support dog.

Gill and Warren Press were flying from Paris to Singapore on Singapore Airlines, en route to their final destination in New Zealand, when they discovered their close-quarters neighbor wasn't human.

They had shelled out for luxury premium economy seats, hoping for a comfortable, relaxing journey, but what they got was an experience that was anything but tranquil.

The dog, which was serving as an emotional support animal for another passenger, was seated far too close for their comfort and raised quite the ruckus—or should we say barkus—with its noises.

Mrs. Press spoke candidly with Stuff magazine about what had happened, recounting, "I heard this noise—a heavy snorting. I thought it was my husband’s phone, but we looked down and realized it was the dog breathing. I said, ‘I’m not having this sitting next to us the whole trip’."

But that was not all. According to Press, "They couldn’t have the dog out in the aisle because they couldn’t get the trolleys through, so it had to come in further, which meant his head was under my husband’s feet. My husband was in shorts, and was getting the dog’s saliva goo on his leg."

wp-image-1263228156 size-full
Credit: NurPhoto / Getty

The final straw was when the dog started farting. Upon asking for alternative seating, they were told that the only available seats were those usually reserved for cabin crew.

The couple later contacted Singapore Airlines, which initially told them the incident would be logged. It was only after the couple logged a formal complaint themselves that they received $120 travel vouchers each. However, they remain dissatisfied, insisting that the vouchers do not make up for the "experience they paid for."

Singapore Airlines released an official statement to The Independent, acknowledging the incident: "Singapore Airlines endeavours to notify customers who may be seated next to an assistance dog prior to boarding the flight. We sincerely apologize that this did not occur in this case, and will work with our airport teams to ensure that this lapse does not occur in future.

"In circumstances where customers seated next to an assistance dog request to be moved, Singapore Airlines will assist to re-seat customers within the same cabin where space permits."

The story serves as a cautionary tale and opens up a wider debate about in-flight etiquette, passenger comfort, and the rights of those traveling with emotional support animals. It’s clear that while airlines strive for customer satisfaction (or at least, should do), this is one flight that neither the couple nor the dog's owner will soon forget.

As the story gains traction online, it also offers airlines a moment to pause and consider the ever-growing complexity of ensuring a pleasant experience for all passengers in today's crowded skies.

Featured image credit: Bruce Bennett / Getty