Hiker discovers 'embarrassing' truth about China's most famous waterfall

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By James Kay

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China's most famous waterfall comes with a slight catch, as park officials have confessed to enhancing the natural wonder.

Chinese park officials have admitted to adding a “small enhancement” to the country’s tallest waterfall after a viral video exposed that the 1,000-foot-high cascade is actually fed by a large pipe discreetly installed in its rock face.

The revelation came to light when a hiker, using the alias “Farisvov,” posted a video on social media, sarcastically captioned: “The one about how I went through all the hardship to the source of Yuntai Waterfall only to see a pipe,” per the New York Post.

The video quickly went viral, garnering tens of millions of views on Chinese platforms Weibo and Douyin.


In response to the viral video, Yuntai Mountain Geopark officials, adopting the persona of the waterfall, posted on social media: “I didn’t expect to meet everyone this way.”

The post continued: “As a seasonal scenery, I can’t guarantee that I will be in my most beautiful form every time you come see me,” acknowledging that the modifications were made to ensure the UNESCO Global Geopark’s millions of annual visitors would always have a spectacular view.

The revelation has sparked a heated debate on Chinese social media. Some users defended the enhancements, with one Weibo user commenting: “People would be disappointed if they end up seeing nothing there,” as reported by the BBC.

Others criticized the park for “not respecting the natural order and not respecting tourists,” and questioned whether the waterfall should retain its status as China’s tallest uninterrupted falls.

GettyImages-540294378.jpgWaterfalls, such as this one in Yosemite National Park, are always a favorite for tourists. Credit: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

In an unrelated story about a waterfall being altered, one couple found themselves in hot water after dyeing one for their gender reveal.

A Brazilian couple opted for a dramatic - and hazardous - reveal at the 59-foot Cachoeira Queima-Pé waterfall. In a viral video, the couple’s guests were seen celebrating as dark blue-dyed water cascaded behind them, accompanied by blue powder cannons.

In response, Mato Grosso's Environment Protection Agency (SEMA) stated that damaging a waterfall in Brazil is considered an "environmental infraction," prohibiting the disposal of waste that contradicts environmental laws.

SEMA investigated and found "no change in the water's physical parameters, such as color and other, and no trace of local fish mortality," according to The Washington Post.

GettyImages-1142087859.jpgAuthorities have played off the revelation cooly. Credit: Shim youngbo / 500px/Getty

Despite the lack of immediate environmental damage, a family member was fined 10,000 Brazilian reals (about $1,933) because Cachoeira Queima-Pé feeds into a river supplying water to Tangará da Serra.

The investigation revealed that the substance used for dyeing, "Blue Lake," is commonly used for bodies of water and swimming pools.

The couple informed SEMA they were unaware that a family member would use a chemical product in the waterfall.

Featured image credit: Shim youngbo / 500px/Getty

Hiker discovers 'embarrassing' truth about China's most famous waterfall

vt-author-image

By James Kay

Article saved!Article saved!

China's most famous waterfall comes with a slight catch, as park officials have confessed to enhancing the natural wonder.

Chinese park officials have admitted to adding a “small enhancement” to the country’s tallest waterfall after a viral video exposed that the 1,000-foot-high cascade is actually fed by a large pipe discreetly installed in its rock face.

The revelation came to light when a hiker, using the alias “Farisvov,” posted a video on social media, sarcastically captioned: “The one about how I went through all the hardship to the source of Yuntai Waterfall only to see a pipe,” per the New York Post.

The video quickly went viral, garnering tens of millions of views on Chinese platforms Weibo and Douyin.


In response to the viral video, Yuntai Mountain Geopark officials, adopting the persona of the waterfall, posted on social media: “I didn’t expect to meet everyone this way.”

The post continued: “As a seasonal scenery, I can’t guarantee that I will be in my most beautiful form every time you come see me,” acknowledging that the modifications were made to ensure the UNESCO Global Geopark’s millions of annual visitors would always have a spectacular view.

The revelation has sparked a heated debate on Chinese social media. Some users defended the enhancements, with one Weibo user commenting: “People would be disappointed if they end up seeing nothing there,” as reported by the BBC.

Others criticized the park for “not respecting the natural order and not respecting tourists,” and questioned whether the waterfall should retain its status as China’s tallest uninterrupted falls.

GettyImages-540294378.jpgWaterfalls, such as this one in Yosemite National Park, are always a favorite for tourists. Credit: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

In an unrelated story about a waterfall being altered, one couple found themselves in hot water after dyeing one for their gender reveal.

A Brazilian couple opted for a dramatic - and hazardous - reveal at the 59-foot Cachoeira Queima-Pé waterfall. In a viral video, the couple’s guests were seen celebrating as dark blue-dyed water cascaded behind them, accompanied by blue powder cannons.

In response, Mato Grosso's Environment Protection Agency (SEMA) stated that damaging a waterfall in Brazil is considered an "environmental infraction," prohibiting the disposal of waste that contradicts environmental laws.

SEMA investigated and found "no change in the water's physical parameters, such as color and other, and no trace of local fish mortality," according to The Washington Post.

GettyImages-1142087859.jpgAuthorities have played off the revelation cooly. Credit: Shim youngbo / 500px/Getty

Despite the lack of immediate environmental damage, a family member was fined 10,000 Brazilian reals (about $1,933) because Cachoeira Queima-Pé feeds into a river supplying water to Tangará da Serra.

The investigation revealed that the substance used for dyeing, "Blue Lake," is commonly used for bodies of water and swimming pools.

The couple informed SEMA they were unaware that a family member would use a chemical product in the waterfall.

Featured image credit: Shim youngbo / 500px/Getty