Japanese cashier allegedly memorised credit card details of 1,300 customers to buy luxury goods online

Japanese cashier allegedly memorised credit card details of 1,300 customers to buy luxury goods online

Photographic memory - also known as eidetic memory - refers to a person's ability to memorise specific details about an object after having only seen it once, and for a short period of time.

Generally, it is a phenomenon that people without a photographic memory are very impressed by. We tend to think of people who can draw whole cities entirely from memory, for instance.

Evidently, though, not everyone with an eidetic memory uses their talent to create detailed works of art - or for any other impressive feat for that matter. Indeed, one Tokyo shop employee allegedly used his photographic memory to note the credit card details of an astonishing 1,300 customers, and later used these details to buy luxury goods online.

This 12-year-old Australian boy used his parents' credit cards to travel to Bali following an argument with his mother:

Susumu Yusuke Taniguchi, 34, is believed to have managed to memorise the names, 16-digit card numbers, expiry dates and security codes from customers' cards while he processed their transactions at a shop in the Japanese capital. He then kept a record of the stolen card details in his notepad.

Taniguchi reportedly resold the items for a profit and then used the money to pay for rent, food and bills, ANN News reports.

Police managed to put an end to the fraudulent scheme when they tracked the sale of two shoulder bags worth $2,600, that were purchased using stolen credit card details. The bags were sent to Taniguchi's apartment, which police then raided.

Inside his home, they discovered a notepad with the credit card details of approximately 1,300 people.

Meet Shiori Ito, the woman who refuses to remain silent on the topic of sexual assault in Japan: