Astronaut who spent a year in space gives advice on how to cope with isolation

Astronaut who spent a year in space gives advice on how to cope with isolation

Now that COVID-19 has been officially declared a global pandemic, people around the world are staying indoors in an attempt to halt the spread of infection.

However, there's no doubt that some people will have a much easier time keeping themselves amused than others. Indeed, there are many people out there who are probably dreading what feels like being under house arrest.

If you're one of those people then don't worry: there's someone out there who has real experience of living in isolation, and he's been more than willing to share his tips on how to survive in quarantine.

Watch this video if you want to know why self-isolating is so important right now: 

Who am I talking about? I'm talking about NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, who spent nearly a year in isolation while on the International Space Station. In a recent interview with The New York Times, Kelly shared some of his tips for how the general public can get through the isolation period.

Kelly stated: "When I went to sleep, I was at work. When I woke up, I was still at work... When you are living and working in the same place for days on end, work can have a way of taking over everything if you let it. Living in space, I deliberately paced myself because I knew I was in it for the long haul — just like we all are today."

He continued: "When you are living and working in the same place for days on end, work can have a way of taking over everything if you let it. Living in space, I deliberately paced myself because I knew I was in it for the long haul - just like we all are today."

"The spread of the coronavirus is showing us that what we share is much more powerful than what keeps us apart, for better or for worse. All people are inescapably interconnected, and the more we can come together to solve our problems, the better off we will all be."

Kelly added: "As helpless as we may feel stuck inside our homes, there are always things we can do. I’ve seen people reading to children via video-conference, donating their time and dollars to charities online, and running errands for elderly or immuno-compromised neighbors. The benefits for the volunteer are just as great as for those helped."

We are urging all of our readers to adhere to the advice from their respective governments and medical bodies, and practice social distancing and self-isolation where required. Together, we will beat this.