Netflix viewers left 'crying their eyes out' over heartbreaking movie Can You See Us?

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By Asiya Ali

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Netflix viewers are seriously praising a new heart-wrenching film called Can You See Us?

The 2022 movie - which recently dropped on the streaming service - was directed by Zambian filmmaker Kenny Mumba, and written by Andrew and Lawrence Thompson.

The emotional story follows a young Zambian boy named Joseph who has albinism and is rejected by his father at birth. After abandonment, he navigates a childhood full of abuse, bullying, and discrimination due to his looks.

Later, Joseph - who is played by Thabo Kaamba as a child, and by George Sikazwe as a young man - finds peace and refuge in music, and manages to succeed by becoming a popular singer in Zambia. However, the very same people who used to torment him now want to be his friend.

Watch the trailer below: 

The film has attracted a lot of attention on social media since being added to the streaming giant, with one user even stating that the story left them "tearing up".

The movie had another viewer emotional as they wrote: "Just finished watching ‘CAN YOU SEE US’ on @netflix and this movie almost brought me to tears. People with albinism are still being persecuted in Zambia, we need to keep shedding more light. Proud of amazing work the production team did."

A third user commented: "If you feel like crying till your eyes are red, try watching 'Can You See Us' on Netflix. Cheers," while a fourth said: "Please who has watched 'Can you see us?' Zambia’s first film on Netflix !? Elegantly, emotionally stirring, simple!"

A fifth added: "Can you see us? On Netflix had me crying my eyes out. Such a beautiful movie."

"Just made me cry what a beautiful movie. This Is the best movie I have seen in 2023," another added. "@cannes will be blessed with this literal masterpiece."

According to the on-screen text at the beginning of the movie, the drama was inspired by the life of John Chiti, a popular Zambian singer with albinism. Chiti reportedly served as an "additional writer" which means that perhaps he incorporated the tough challenges he faced growing up into the script.

As in the movie, the 'Nga Uleya' musician was rejected by his father because of his condition. He opened up about this in a 2020 interview with the Thomson Reuters Foundation, revealing: "When I was born my family was confused. They couldn’t believe that I belonged and this led to the divorce of my parents."

Per Dexerto, Kenny Roc Mumba said the film "challenges preconceived notions, explores the depths of human connection, and delves into the complexities of perception," adding: "It is a testament to the power of embracing the unexpected and finding beauty in the unconventional."

The Zambian filmmaker also shared that he hopes the story sheds light "on the experiences of those living with albinism" so that we can continue to break down barriers and foster better understanding.

Can You See Us? is currently streaming on Netflix.

Featured image credit: FG Trade / Getty

Netflix viewers left 'crying their eyes out' over heartbreaking movie Can You See Us?

vt-author-image

By Asiya Ali

Article saved!Article saved!

Netflix viewers are seriously praising a new heart-wrenching film called Can You See Us?

The 2022 movie - which recently dropped on the streaming service - was directed by Zambian filmmaker Kenny Mumba, and written by Andrew and Lawrence Thompson.

The emotional story follows a young Zambian boy named Joseph who has albinism and is rejected by his father at birth. After abandonment, he navigates a childhood full of abuse, bullying, and discrimination due to his looks.

Later, Joseph - who is played by Thabo Kaamba as a child, and by George Sikazwe as a young man - finds peace and refuge in music, and manages to succeed by becoming a popular singer in Zambia. However, the very same people who used to torment him now want to be his friend.

Watch the trailer below: 

The film has attracted a lot of attention on social media since being added to the streaming giant, with one user even stating that the story left them "tearing up".

The movie had another viewer emotional as they wrote: "Just finished watching ‘CAN YOU SEE US’ on @netflix and this movie almost brought me to tears. People with albinism are still being persecuted in Zambia, we need to keep shedding more light. Proud of amazing work the production team did."

A third user commented: "If you feel like crying till your eyes are red, try watching 'Can You See Us' on Netflix. Cheers," while a fourth said: "Please who has watched 'Can you see us?' Zambia’s first film on Netflix !? Elegantly, emotionally stirring, simple!"

A fifth added: "Can you see us? On Netflix had me crying my eyes out. Such a beautiful movie."

"Just made me cry what a beautiful movie. This Is the best movie I have seen in 2023," another added. "@cannes will be blessed with this literal masterpiece."

According to the on-screen text at the beginning of the movie, the drama was inspired by the life of John Chiti, a popular Zambian singer with albinism. Chiti reportedly served as an "additional writer" which means that perhaps he incorporated the tough challenges he faced growing up into the script.

As in the movie, the 'Nga Uleya' musician was rejected by his father because of his condition. He opened up about this in a 2020 interview with the Thomson Reuters Foundation, revealing: "When I was born my family was confused. They couldn’t believe that I belonged and this led to the divorce of my parents."

Per Dexerto, Kenny Roc Mumba said the film "challenges preconceived notions, explores the depths of human connection, and delves into the complexities of perception," adding: "It is a testament to the power of embracing the unexpected and finding beauty in the unconventional."

The Zambian filmmaker also shared that he hopes the story sheds light "on the experiences of those living with albinism" so that we can continue to break down barriers and foster better understanding.

Can You See Us? is currently streaming on Netflix.

Featured image credit: FG Trade / Getty