Netflix viewers issue warning to people thinking about watching new show 'All The Light We Cannot See'

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By stefan armitage

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If you're looking for something to binge-watch this weekend, you may want to think twice about one of Netflix's latest offerings.

Yesterday, the streaming platform dropped its newest drama, All The Light We Cannot See. The miniseries is based on Anthony Doerr’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name. Check out the trailer for the drama below: 

The four-part limited series tells the story of two teenagers - the blind French girl Marie-Laure and the Nazi-hired German boy Werner - whose paths cross during World War II.

It stars Aria Mia Loberti and Louis Hofmann as the two lead roles, as well as Marvel's Mark Ruffalo, House star Hugh Laurie, and The Crown star Marion Bailey.

However, despite the stunning trailer, acclaimed source material, and star cast, viewers of the series are warning other Netflix subscribers about tuning in.

And this is probably where you're expecting me to share tweets about how heartbreaking the show is or maybe how scary some of the scenes are... but no. It turns out many viewers just think the show is a major disappointment that's a disservice to the source material.

"Avoid the Netflix adaptation of All The Light We Cannot See, it's spectacularly shit. Like an episode of Allo Allo complete with a Herr Flick-esque villain," one X user writes. "Massive let down as the book is great."

A second adds: "After months of waiting for it, All the Light We Cannot See on Netflix is such a *massive* disappointment. I’m almost mad at how bad it is. Can someone else take a stab at it? What a waste of a gorgeous story."

And a third agrees, tweeting: "All the Light We Cannot See is one of my favorite books and this show is just not doing it justice. I hope it can be remade in a decade by someone who can do it better. So disappointing."

"The All The Light We Cannot See limited series is NOTHING like the book. Absolutely so disappointing," writes a fourth gutted viewer.

Additionally, the show currently boasts a lackluster 24% critics score on Rotten Tomatoes (but the audience score is a little kinder at 68%).

This certainly wasn't the goal of Shawn Levy, the series' director, who told Netflix's Tudum: "My central message to fans of the book—and I’m screaming this from the top of the mountain here—is, ‘I’m as big a fan as you. [My goal was] to do justice to this gorgeous novel that touched me deeply."

But perhaps the series is more enjoyable if you haven't read the book first, as All The Light We Cannot See currently boasts a more-than-respectable 7.9/10 on IMDb after more than 1,000 audience ratings.

Fortunately, the show has been praised for accurately bringing a blind heroine to the small screen, as both Loberti and Nell Sutton - the actress who plays a young Marie-Laure - are both legally blind.

So, do you think you can bring yourself to watch?

Featured image credit: NurPhoto / Getty

Netflix viewers issue warning to people thinking about watching new show 'All The Light We Cannot See'

vt-author-image

By stefan armitage

Article saved!Article saved!

If you're looking for something to binge-watch this weekend, you may want to think twice about one of Netflix's latest offerings.

Yesterday, the streaming platform dropped its newest drama, All The Light We Cannot See. The miniseries is based on Anthony Doerr’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name. Check out the trailer for the drama below: 

The four-part limited series tells the story of two teenagers - the blind French girl Marie-Laure and the Nazi-hired German boy Werner - whose paths cross during World War II.

It stars Aria Mia Loberti and Louis Hofmann as the two lead roles, as well as Marvel's Mark Ruffalo, House star Hugh Laurie, and The Crown star Marion Bailey.

However, despite the stunning trailer, acclaimed source material, and star cast, viewers of the series are warning other Netflix subscribers about tuning in.

And this is probably where you're expecting me to share tweets about how heartbreaking the show is or maybe how scary some of the scenes are... but no. It turns out many viewers just think the show is a major disappointment that's a disservice to the source material.

"Avoid the Netflix adaptation of All The Light We Cannot See, it's spectacularly shit. Like an episode of Allo Allo complete with a Herr Flick-esque villain," one X user writes. "Massive let down as the book is great."

A second adds: "After months of waiting for it, All the Light We Cannot See on Netflix is such a *massive* disappointment. I’m almost mad at how bad it is. Can someone else take a stab at it? What a waste of a gorgeous story."

And a third agrees, tweeting: "All the Light We Cannot See is one of my favorite books and this show is just not doing it justice. I hope it can be remade in a decade by someone who can do it better. So disappointing."

"The All The Light We Cannot See limited series is NOTHING like the book. Absolutely so disappointing," writes a fourth gutted viewer.

Additionally, the show currently boasts a lackluster 24% critics score on Rotten Tomatoes (but the audience score is a little kinder at 68%).

This certainly wasn't the goal of Shawn Levy, the series' director, who told Netflix's Tudum: "My central message to fans of the book—and I’m screaming this from the top of the mountain here—is, ‘I’m as big a fan as you. [My goal was] to do justice to this gorgeous novel that touched me deeply."

But perhaps the series is more enjoyable if you haven't read the book first, as All The Light We Cannot See currently boasts a more-than-respectable 7.9/10 on IMDb after more than 1,000 audience ratings.

Fortunately, the show has been praised for accurately bringing a blind heroine to the small screen, as both Loberti and Nell Sutton - the actress who plays a young Marie-Laure - are both legally blind.

So, do you think you can bring yourself to watch?

Featured image credit: NurPhoto / Getty