$60,000 raised for man who was set to be 'euthanized' because he couldn't afford to live

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By James Kay

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A man facing financial struggles and who applied to be legally euthanized has had his life turn around for the better.

After Amir Farsoud from Canada found out that the rooming house where he lived was being put on the market, he took drastic action and applied for the country's controversial medical assistance in dying program, known as MAID.

In 2016, Canada introduced a law allowing medically assisted dying for eligible Canadian adults. Changes to the legislation were made in March 2021 that allowed a broader group of people to become eligible, per the Canadian government website.

The government state that there are strict guidelines as to who can use MAID. Anyone applying must be over 18 and "mentally competent," eligible to use Canada's healthcare system, have a "grievous and irremediable medical condition," make a voluntary request to use the system, and give informed consent.

Farsoud lives with untreatable back pain, which made him eligible for the program. However, it wasn't the pain that was causing him to apply, but the thought of homelessness due to financial struggles, per the Daily Mail.

As reported by the Independent, Farsoud relied on government payments for food and housing and would sometimes find himself with as little as $7 a day to feed himself. When he later learned that the accommodation that he shared with two roommates went up for sale, he considered using the medically assisted dying program out of fear he would not be able to find new housing.

Fortunately, when his story was shared by CityNews in Canada, an anonymous good samaritan decided that Farsoud shouldn't have to be considering such extreme measures due to financial worries.

A GoFundMe page was set up in his honor and quickly gained support. At the time of writing, the fundraiser has over $60,000 in donations from 1,200 donors.

The money raised has allowed Farsoud to look into the future, as he commented on the fundraising page. "Due to your unbelievable kindness and support, as well as that of others who are helping me find a long-term housing solution, I have been given a second chance at life," he said.

"When October started, I was 100% certain that I would not live to see 2023," he continued. "Now, because of all of you, I can once again dare [to] think of a future, and for that amazing, sweet gift, I would like to thank each and every one of you from the bottom of my heart."

Farsoud also used the platform to shed light on others facing the same situation that he found himself in, and has urged well-wishers to show those struggling the same support they offered him during his time of need.

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Credit: GoFundMe

Farsoud is currently looking for housing, and we wish him all the best for the future.

If you or someone you know is in crisis, please reach out for help and contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255, text HOME to 741741, or visit SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources.

Featured image credit: Steve Cukrov / Alamy

$60,000 raised for man who was set to be 'euthanized' because he couldn't afford to live

vt-author-image

By James Kay

Article saved!Article saved!

A man facing financial struggles and who applied to be legally euthanized has had his life turn around for the better.

After Amir Farsoud from Canada found out that the rooming house where he lived was being put on the market, he took drastic action and applied for the country's controversial medical assistance in dying program, known as MAID.

In 2016, Canada introduced a law allowing medically assisted dying for eligible Canadian adults. Changes to the legislation were made in March 2021 that allowed a broader group of people to become eligible, per the Canadian government website.

The government state that there are strict guidelines as to who can use MAID. Anyone applying must be over 18 and "mentally competent," eligible to use Canada's healthcare system, have a "grievous and irremediable medical condition," make a voluntary request to use the system, and give informed consent.

Farsoud lives with untreatable back pain, which made him eligible for the program. However, it wasn't the pain that was causing him to apply, but the thought of homelessness due to financial struggles, per the Daily Mail.

As reported by the Independent, Farsoud relied on government payments for food and housing and would sometimes find himself with as little as $7 a day to feed himself. When he later learned that the accommodation that he shared with two roommates went up for sale, he considered using the medically assisted dying program out of fear he would not be able to find new housing.

Fortunately, when his story was shared by CityNews in Canada, an anonymous good samaritan decided that Farsoud shouldn't have to be considering such extreme measures due to financial worries.

A GoFundMe page was set up in his honor and quickly gained support. At the time of writing, the fundraiser has over $60,000 in donations from 1,200 donors.

The money raised has allowed Farsoud to look into the future, as he commented on the fundraising page. "Due to your unbelievable kindness and support, as well as that of others who are helping me find a long-term housing solution, I have been given a second chance at life," he said.

"When October started, I was 100% certain that I would not live to see 2023," he continued. "Now, because of all of you, I can once again dare [to] think of a future, and for that amazing, sweet gift, I would like to thank each and every one of you from the bottom of my heart."

Farsoud also used the platform to shed light on others facing the same situation that he found himself in, and has urged well-wishers to show those struggling the same support they offered him during his time of need.

size-full wp-image-1263180434
Credit: GoFundMe

Farsoud is currently looking for housing, and we wish him all the best for the future.

If you or someone you know is in crisis, please reach out for help and contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255, text HOME to 741741, or visit SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources.

Featured image credit: Steve Cukrov / Alamy