Man is horrified by 'skanky' name wife wants for their daughter

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By James Kay

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A man has been left shocked by the name that his wife wants for his daughter, as he's worried that she'll be branded a "skank".

Choosing a name for a newborn isn't something that should be taken lightly, because they're the ones who will have to go through their life with it.

I can only imagine that some couples don't see eye to eye on some names either, and it can be a struggle to come to an agreement, just like in this case.

In a recent entry to Slate's advice column, a second-generation Greek immigrant shared his apprehension over his wife's choice for their soon-to-arrive daughter's name.

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The couple have differing opinions on the name. Credit: Jeffrey Coolidge/Getty

The anonymous father-to-be, who had initially agreed on a mythological name, expressed his concerns about the proposed name "Clytemnestra".

He fears that their daughter might be unfairly judged due to the name, describing it as a potential three-syllable "skank."

The man said: "This has led to an extremely severe but also extremely stupid argument. You see, my wife wants to name our daughter 'Clytemnestra,' and I am dead set against it."

Offering alternative suggestions such as Penelope, Andromache, or Galatea, he emphasized the lack of familial or social connections to the name Clytemnestra, stating: "None of my relatives back in the old country bear that name. Nobody I've asked knows anyone named Clytemnestra."

The root of the husband's objection lies in the ancient writings of Sophocles, where Clytemnestra is portrayed as the adulterous wife of General Agamemnon, orchestrating his murder in a revenge plot.

The father-to-be expressed: "She's thought of as the skank who murdered her husband when he finally came home and was about to discover the affair she'd been carrying on while he was away."

The couple finds themselves at an impasse, with both parties unwilling to compromise, resulting in what the father-to-be described as a standoff where they are "both digging in our heels."

On the topic of baby names, a British couple found themselves locked in a battle with a registrar who wouldn't allow them to call their son Lucifer.

Dan and Mandy Sheldon, excited to officially name their child, were met with disdain, with the registrar expressing concerns about the name's implications on their son's future.

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Some names are banned in various countries. Credit: Comstock/Getty

"We were really excited to go and get him registered but the woman looked at us in utter disgust. She told us he would never be able to get a job, and that teachers wouldn’t want to teach him," explained Dan.

The controversial choice of "Lucifer" raised eyebrows, given its association with the devil. However, the couple argued that the name holds a more pleasant meaning in Greek, translating to "light-bringer" and "morning."

The registrar also highlighted that the name is illegal in some countries, including New Zealand, and is linked to Christian theology, making it prohibited in Christian-majority nations like Germany and Switzerland.

However, after much insistence, the registrar reluctantly allowed the name to be officially registered on their son's birth certificate, admitting: "Eventually she did it, but it was through gritted teeth."

In response to the controversy, Derbyshire County Council issued a statement, apologizing if the couple was offended.

Featured image credit: Comstock/Getty

Man is horrified by 'skanky' name wife wants for their daughter

vt-author-image

By James Kay

Article saved!Article saved!

A man has been left shocked by the name that his wife wants for his daughter, as he's worried that she'll be branded a "skank".

Choosing a name for a newborn isn't something that should be taken lightly, because they're the ones who will have to go through their life with it.

I can only imagine that some couples don't see eye to eye on some names either, and it can be a struggle to come to an agreement, just like in this case.

In a recent entry to Slate's advice column, a second-generation Greek immigrant shared his apprehension over his wife's choice for their soon-to-arrive daughter's name.

size-full wp-image-1263243333
The couple have differing opinions on the name. Credit: Jeffrey Coolidge/Getty

The anonymous father-to-be, who had initially agreed on a mythological name, expressed his concerns about the proposed name "Clytemnestra".

He fears that their daughter might be unfairly judged due to the name, describing it as a potential three-syllable "skank."

The man said: "This has led to an extremely severe but also extremely stupid argument. You see, my wife wants to name our daughter 'Clytemnestra,' and I am dead set against it."

Offering alternative suggestions such as Penelope, Andromache, or Galatea, he emphasized the lack of familial or social connections to the name Clytemnestra, stating: "None of my relatives back in the old country bear that name. Nobody I've asked knows anyone named Clytemnestra."

The root of the husband's objection lies in the ancient writings of Sophocles, where Clytemnestra is portrayed as the adulterous wife of General Agamemnon, orchestrating his murder in a revenge plot.

The father-to-be expressed: "She's thought of as the skank who murdered her husband when he finally came home and was about to discover the affair she'd been carrying on while he was away."

The couple finds themselves at an impasse, with both parties unwilling to compromise, resulting in what the father-to-be described as a standoff where they are "both digging in our heels."

On the topic of baby names, a British couple found themselves locked in a battle with a registrar who wouldn't allow them to call their son Lucifer.

Dan and Mandy Sheldon, excited to officially name their child, were met with disdain, with the registrar expressing concerns about the name's implications on their son's future.

size-full wp-image-1263243335
Some names are banned in various countries. Credit: Comstock/Getty

"We were really excited to go and get him registered but the woman looked at us in utter disgust. She told us he would never be able to get a job, and that teachers wouldn’t want to teach him," explained Dan.

The controversial choice of "Lucifer" raised eyebrows, given its association with the devil. However, the couple argued that the name holds a more pleasant meaning in Greek, translating to "light-bringer" and "morning."

The registrar also highlighted that the name is illegal in some countries, including New Zealand, and is linked to Christian theology, making it prohibited in Christian-majority nations like Germany and Switzerland.

However, after much insistence, the registrar reluctantly allowed the name to be officially registered on their son's birth certificate, admitting: "Eventually she did it, but it was through gritted teeth."

In response to the controversy, Derbyshire County Council issued a statement, apologizing if the couple was offended.

Featured image credit: Comstock/Getty