People are arguing about whether it's safe or 'too cautious' to lock the door when you're at home

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By Kim Novak

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Home security is one of those things you probably don't give much thought to day-to-day, particularly if you live in an area where crime is low, but you'd assume most people would at least lock their doors as standard.

Of course, if you're leaving the house empty for any period of time, locking up would be second nature to pretty much everyone.

But how about when you or your family is actually in?

One woman has sparked a debate online after she revealed that her husband had criticized her for locking the front door while inside their home.

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The woman revealed her husband thinks she is being overly cautious. Credit: Getty

Writing anonymously on the forum MumsNet, the woman revealed that she locks the front door while she's in the house "not always but often enough that [other half] comments that I'm a bit obsessive about it and tbh I feel I'm a bit overly cautious."

She added: "Context is we live in a pleasant suburb in a peaceful neighborhood where there is a very low crime rate. However occasionally over the years people have had someone walk in through their unlocked front door in broad daylight - even when they were in - pinch stuff and scarper.

"It was quite a scary experience especially for one old person who was living alone. As I say this has happened maybe twice in the 12 years we've lived here. My thinking is 'better safe than sorry.'"

She revealed that her door locks with a key rather than a latch but added that she leaves the key inside the lock so it is easy to open in case of emergencies, and she makes sure to lock the front door "if ever we are in the back garden or upstairs or I'm leaving the (now adult) kids at home and they are upstairs."

The woman admitted her husband and their children "sometimes raise their eyes and think I'm being OTT" and admitted that "in terms of crime rate statistics in our area it's not really necessary" and didn't want to spark fear in her children for no reason, but chose to still lock the door just in case.

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Credit: MumsNet

Her choice to lock up left commenters divided, with one writing: "I don’t lock ours in the day, unless I’m leaving the (teen) children home alone."

Another pointed out potential safety issues that locking the door could have in the event of an emergency, explaining: "If your front door is locked, how easy would it be to get out in the event of a fire? I always think the two have to be balanced against each other. Electrical faults, knocked over candles, kitchen fires etc do happen too. You need to ensure you can get out easily if there was a fire."

A third added: "I’d think more likelihood of needing to get out quickly than someone getting in and stealing stuff while you’re in the house. Our door needs locking with a key when inside so if someone moved the key that could delay getting out. Depends where you live and what your door is like though. Going into someone’s house while they are in is such a high-risk and low reward crime for the burglar that I can’t get that excited about it."

Someone else commented: "People always keep their doors locked? I've never heard of anyone doing this when they're home and would say it's OTT. Sometimes we leave it unlocked when we're out of the house if we're not going to be long."

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Credit: MumsNet
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Credit: MumsNet
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Credit: MumsNet
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Credit: MumsNet 

Others agreed with the original poster, adding: "[You are not being unreasonable], I do it to. There are plenty of pros to doing this, and as far as I can see no cons", while another wrote: "Yes of course. You'd have to be a b***dy idiot to not lock your door," and: "I always lock my door. I thought most people did."

One user, who is an avid true crime fan, explained: "Always keep mine locked! Why on Earth wouldn’t you? Draw back of locking it…none. Possible draw back of not…? Theft/being murdered! I listen to way too many true crime podcasts to swan around with an unlocked door," while another wrote: "I always lock mine too! Can't see any reason not to. Why make it easy for passing chancers to get in?"

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Credit: MumsNet
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Credit: MumsNet
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Credit: MumsNet
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Credit: MumsNet

Someone also pointed out that not having the door locked could invalidate your home insurance claim in the event that someone did break in to rob the place.

"I amazes me there are people who DON'T have their door perpetually locked. Might want to check the small print in your home and contents insurance," they advised.

While the chances of someone walking into your unlocked house are pretty low, it's always a possibility so it's better to be safe than sorry and lock the door - just make sure you also have a quick and accessible way of escaping should an emergency such as a fire occur inside.

Featured image credit: Getty

People are arguing about whether it's safe or 'too cautious' to lock the door when you're at home

vt-author-image

By Kim Novak

Article saved!Article saved!

Home security is one of those things you probably don't give much thought to day-to-day, particularly if you live in an area where crime is low, but you'd assume most people would at least lock their doors as standard.

Of course, if you're leaving the house empty for any period of time, locking up would be second nature to pretty much everyone.

But how about when you or your family is actually in?

One woman has sparked a debate online after she revealed that her husband had criticized her for locking the front door while inside their home.

wp-image-1263222990 size-full
The woman revealed her husband thinks she is being overly cautious. Credit: Getty

Writing anonymously on the forum MumsNet, the woman revealed that she locks the front door while she's in the house "not always but often enough that [other half] comments that I'm a bit obsessive about it and tbh I feel I'm a bit overly cautious."

She added: "Context is we live in a pleasant suburb in a peaceful neighborhood where there is a very low crime rate. However occasionally over the years people have had someone walk in through their unlocked front door in broad daylight - even when they were in - pinch stuff and scarper.

"It was quite a scary experience especially for one old person who was living alone. As I say this has happened maybe twice in the 12 years we've lived here. My thinking is 'better safe than sorry.'"

She revealed that her door locks with a key rather than a latch but added that she leaves the key inside the lock so it is easy to open in case of emergencies, and she makes sure to lock the front door "if ever we are in the back garden or upstairs or I'm leaving the (now adult) kids at home and they are upstairs."

The woman admitted her husband and their children "sometimes raise their eyes and think I'm being OTT" and admitted that "in terms of crime rate statistics in our area it's not really necessary" and didn't want to spark fear in her children for no reason, but chose to still lock the door just in case.

wp-image-1263222991 size-full
Credit: MumsNet

Her choice to lock up left commenters divided, with one writing: "I don’t lock ours in the day, unless I’m leaving the (teen) children home alone."

Another pointed out potential safety issues that locking the door could have in the event of an emergency, explaining: "If your front door is locked, how easy would it be to get out in the event of a fire? I always think the two have to be balanced against each other. Electrical faults, knocked over candles, kitchen fires etc do happen too. You need to ensure you can get out easily if there was a fire."

A third added: "I’d think more likelihood of needing to get out quickly than someone getting in and stealing stuff while you’re in the house. Our door needs locking with a key when inside so if someone moved the key that could delay getting out. Depends where you live and what your door is like though. Going into someone’s house while they are in is such a high-risk and low reward crime for the burglar that I can’t get that excited about it."

Someone else commented: "People always keep their doors locked? I've never heard of anyone doing this when they're home and would say it's OTT. Sometimes we leave it unlocked when we're out of the house if we're not going to be long."

wp-image-1263222995 size-full
Credit: MumsNet
wp-image-1263222998 size-full
Credit: MumsNet
wp-image-1263222993 size-full
Credit: MumsNet
wp-image-1263222994 size-full
Credit: MumsNet 

Others agreed with the original poster, adding: "[You are not being unreasonable], I do it to. There are plenty of pros to doing this, and as far as I can see no cons", while another wrote: "Yes of course. You'd have to be a b***dy idiot to not lock your door," and: "I always lock my door. I thought most people did."

One user, who is an avid true crime fan, explained: "Always keep mine locked! Why on Earth wouldn’t you? Draw back of locking it…none. Possible draw back of not…? Theft/being murdered! I listen to way too many true crime podcasts to swan around with an unlocked door," while another wrote: "I always lock mine too! Can't see any reason not to. Why make it easy for passing chancers to get in?"

wp-image-1263222992 size-full
Credit: MumsNet
wp-image-1263222999 size-full
Credit: MumsNet
wp-image-1263222997 size-full
Credit: MumsNet
wp-image-1263222996 size-full
Credit: MumsNet

Someone also pointed out that not having the door locked could invalidate your home insurance claim in the event that someone did break in to rob the place.

"I amazes me there are people who DON'T have their door perpetually locked. Might want to check the small print in your home and contents insurance," they advised.

While the chances of someone walking into your unlocked house are pretty low, it's always a possibility so it's better to be safe than sorry and lock the door - just make sure you also have a quick and accessible way of escaping should an emergency such as a fire occur inside.

Featured image credit: Getty