The life and career of Dr. Michael Mosley whose body was found on beach on Greek island

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By James Kay

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Dr. Michael Mosley has sadly passed away on the Greek island of Symi, and his life and career are now being celebrated.

As previously reported, TV doctor Michael Mosley went missing on the Greek island of Symi on Wednesday.

After days of searching, a body was found near a dangerous cave complex ominously known to locals as the Abyss, along with an umbrella.

The body, which was spotted by a local camera crew, has since been identified as Mosley.

Mosley, a medical school graduate, began his journey at the BBC as a trainee assistant producer in 1985.

GettyImages-1174937997.jpgMosley has sadly died in Greece. Credit: Brook Mitchell / Getty

He quickly demonstrated an exceptional ability to convey groundbreaking scientific and medical ideas to broad audiences, a talent that he would repeatedly leverage throughout his career.

Behind the cameras, Mosley contributed to influential programs such as Tomorrow’s World and weather-based shows like Superstorm and Could We Survive a Mega-Tsunami?

In 1995, the British Medical Association named him Medical Journalist of the Year for his Horizon episode Ulcer Wars, per the Guardian.

The episode highlighted the medical community's reluctance to accept that ulcers were caused by the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, not stress, and could be treated with antibiotics instead of surgery.

GettyImages-1174938063.jpgCredit: Brook Mitchell / Getty

Mosley's career truly flourished when he decided to step in front of the camera. His presenting debut came with 2006's Medical Mavericks, a history series exploring medical advancements in vaccination, anesthesia, and infection control.

One episode featured doctors who intentionally infected themselves with diseases to study their effects, setting a precedent for Mosley's hands-on approach to research.

In 2014, Mosley took this approach to new extremes by swallowing three tapeworm cysts from infected cattle to observe their impact on his body for a BBC Four series.

Although he remained asymptomatic, he gained a kilogram in weight, possibly due to an increased appetite.

By then, Mosley was already a household name. His regular appearances on BBC Breakfast, The One Show, and various medical documentaries, where he often made himself both the subject and the presenter, cemented his status as one of the BBC's most recognizable faces.

GettyImages-1174938020.jpgCredit: Brook Mitchell / Getty

The turning point in his career came with the 2012 Horizon episode Eat, Fast and Live Longer.

This program popularized the 5:2 diet, a method of intermittent fasting involving the consumption of only 500 calories on two days each week. Mosley claimed the diet not only aided weight loss but also reduced insulin levels and inflammation.

Although he did not invent the 5:2 diet, Mosley popularized it to such an extent that he authored several best-selling books on the subject.

His ideas later evolved into the Fast 800 diet, a low-calorie, low-carbohydrate Mediterranean diet that also incorporated intermittent fasting.

Our thoughts remain with Mosley's loved ones at this time.

Featured image credit: Brook Mitchell / Getty

The life and career of Dr. Michael Mosley whose body was found on beach on Greek island

vt-author-image

By James Kay

Article saved!Article saved!

Dr. Michael Mosley has sadly passed away on the Greek island of Symi, and his life and career are now being celebrated.

As previously reported, TV doctor Michael Mosley went missing on the Greek island of Symi on Wednesday.

After days of searching, a body was found near a dangerous cave complex ominously known to locals as the Abyss, along with an umbrella.

The body, which was spotted by a local camera crew, has since been identified as Mosley.

Mosley, a medical school graduate, began his journey at the BBC as a trainee assistant producer in 1985.

GettyImages-1174937997.jpgMosley has sadly died in Greece. Credit: Brook Mitchell / Getty

He quickly demonstrated an exceptional ability to convey groundbreaking scientific and medical ideas to broad audiences, a talent that he would repeatedly leverage throughout his career.

Behind the cameras, Mosley contributed to influential programs such as Tomorrow’s World and weather-based shows like Superstorm and Could We Survive a Mega-Tsunami?

In 1995, the British Medical Association named him Medical Journalist of the Year for his Horizon episode Ulcer Wars, per the Guardian.

The episode highlighted the medical community's reluctance to accept that ulcers were caused by the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, not stress, and could be treated with antibiotics instead of surgery.

GettyImages-1174938063.jpgCredit: Brook Mitchell / Getty

Mosley's career truly flourished when he decided to step in front of the camera. His presenting debut came with 2006's Medical Mavericks, a history series exploring medical advancements in vaccination, anesthesia, and infection control.

One episode featured doctors who intentionally infected themselves with diseases to study their effects, setting a precedent for Mosley's hands-on approach to research.

In 2014, Mosley took this approach to new extremes by swallowing three tapeworm cysts from infected cattle to observe their impact on his body for a BBC Four series.

Although he remained asymptomatic, he gained a kilogram in weight, possibly due to an increased appetite.

By then, Mosley was already a household name. His regular appearances on BBC Breakfast, The One Show, and various medical documentaries, where he often made himself both the subject and the presenter, cemented his status as one of the BBC's most recognizable faces.

GettyImages-1174938020.jpgCredit: Brook Mitchell / Getty

The turning point in his career came with the 2012 Horizon episode Eat, Fast and Live Longer.

This program popularized the 5:2 diet, a method of intermittent fasting involving the consumption of only 500 calories on two days each week. Mosley claimed the diet not only aided weight loss but also reduced insulin levels and inflammation.

Although he did not invent the 5:2 diet, Mosley popularized it to such an extent that he authored several best-selling books on the subject.

His ideas later evolved into the Fast 800 diet, a low-calorie, low-carbohydrate Mediterranean diet that also incorporated intermittent fasting.

Our thoughts remain with Mosley's loved ones at this time.

Featured image credit: Brook Mitchell / Getty