SouthWest Boeing 737 out of service after scary ‘Dutch roll' incident at 32,000 feet

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By stefan armitage

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A SouthWest Boeing airplane has been ruled out of service following a scary 'Dutch roll' at 32,000 feet.

Officials have revealed that the Boeing 737 Max aircraft has been grounded for 20 days following a alarming incident, during which, the plane encountered a perilous "Dutch roll" - causing it to sway from side to side, in yet another setback for the troubled aviation giant.

GettyImages-2026350896.jpgThe scary incident involved a SouthWest Boeing 737 MAX. Credit: Kevin Carter / Getty

The unsettling action - known as a Dutch roll - involves a combination of yawing and rocking motion, likened to the movements of a Dutch ice skater, the Daily Mail reports.

The incident occurred on a Southwest Airlines flight from Phoenix, Arizona, to Oakland, California, with 175 passengers and six crew members on board.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the aircraft experienced an unsafe oscillation of the tail and wings mid-flight on June 12.

GettyImages-1133229737.jpgThe plane in question has been grounded for 20 days. Credit: Mario Tama / Getty

Although pilots managed to regain control, a post-landing inspection revealed significant damage to the standby power control unit, critical for backup rudder power.

Fortunately, no injuries were reported among passengers, but the damage sustained by the aircraft was described as substantial.

Currently, there is uncertainty about when the aircraft will be cleared to resume flights.

"The FAA is collaborating closely with the NTSB and Boeing to investigate this incident. We will take appropriate actions based on the investigation's findings," the FAA stated in response to inquiries from The Independent, highlighting that no similar issues have been reported by other airlines.

GettyImages-1133229630.jpgThe incident has led to a federal investigation. Credit: Mario Tama / Getty

Boeing declined to comment directly to the news outlet, redirecting inquiries to Southwest Airlines.

In response to queries, a Southwest Airlines spokesperson directed attention to ongoing investigations by the NTSB and FAA, adding: "Southwest is participating in and supporting the investigation."

Efforts to seek comment from the NTSB via email were made by The Independent, per the outlet.

This incident is the latest in a string of challenges faced by Boeing aircraft in recent times. Notably, a significant mishap occurred in January when a door plug malfunctioned on an Alaska Airlines flight in transit.

Boeing is also navigating potential legal issues, including a Justice Department claim last month alleging breaches of a settlement agreement designed to avert criminal prosecution following two fatal crashes involving its 737 Max aircraft in 2018 and 2019. Boeing has contested these claims, asserting its adherence to the terms of the agreement as recently reaffirmed.

Internally, Boeing faces concerns from whistleblowers and employees. Despite the tragic deaths of two whistleblowers, approximately 50 current and former Boeing employees have expressed intentions to voice safety concerns, as previously disclosed to The Independent by legal sources.

Featured image credit: Kevin Carter / Getty

SouthWest Boeing 737 out of service after scary ‘Dutch roll' incident at 32,000 feet

vt-author-image

By stefan armitage

Article saved!Article saved!

A SouthWest Boeing airplane has been ruled out of service following a scary 'Dutch roll' at 32,000 feet.

Officials have revealed that the Boeing 737 Max aircraft has been grounded for 20 days following a alarming incident, during which, the plane encountered a perilous "Dutch roll" - causing it to sway from side to side, in yet another setback for the troubled aviation giant.

GettyImages-2026350896.jpgThe scary incident involved a SouthWest Boeing 737 MAX. Credit: Kevin Carter / Getty

The unsettling action - known as a Dutch roll - involves a combination of yawing and rocking motion, likened to the movements of a Dutch ice skater, the Daily Mail reports.

The incident occurred on a Southwest Airlines flight from Phoenix, Arizona, to Oakland, California, with 175 passengers and six crew members on board.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the aircraft experienced an unsafe oscillation of the tail and wings mid-flight on June 12.

GettyImages-1133229737.jpgThe plane in question has been grounded for 20 days. Credit: Mario Tama / Getty

Although pilots managed to regain control, a post-landing inspection revealed significant damage to the standby power control unit, critical for backup rudder power.

Fortunately, no injuries were reported among passengers, but the damage sustained by the aircraft was described as substantial.

Currently, there is uncertainty about when the aircraft will be cleared to resume flights.

"The FAA is collaborating closely with the NTSB and Boeing to investigate this incident. We will take appropriate actions based on the investigation's findings," the FAA stated in response to inquiries from The Independent, highlighting that no similar issues have been reported by other airlines.

GettyImages-1133229630.jpgThe incident has led to a federal investigation. Credit: Mario Tama / Getty

Boeing declined to comment directly to the news outlet, redirecting inquiries to Southwest Airlines.

In response to queries, a Southwest Airlines spokesperson directed attention to ongoing investigations by the NTSB and FAA, adding: "Southwest is participating in and supporting the investigation."

Efforts to seek comment from the NTSB via email were made by The Independent, per the outlet.

This incident is the latest in a string of challenges faced by Boeing aircraft in recent times. Notably, a significant mishap occurred in January when a door plug malfunctioned on an Alaska Airlines flight in transit.

Boeing is also navigating potential legal issues, including a Justice Department claim last month alleging breaches of a settlement agreement designed to avert criminal prosecution following two fatal crashes involving its 737 Max aircraft in 2018 and 2019. Boeing has contested these claims, asserting its adherence to the terms of the agreement as recently reaffirmed.

Internally, Boeing faces concerns from whistleblowers and employees. Despite the tragic deaths of two whistleblowers, approximately 50 current and former Boeing employees have expressed intentions to voice safety concerns, as previously disclosed to The Independent by legal sources.

Featured image credit: Kevin Carter / Getty