Woman hired flash mob to dance to 'Another One Bites the Dust' at her own funeral

vt-author-image

By James Kay

Article saved!Article saved!

A woman hired a flash mob to dance to Queen's iconic 'Another One Bites the Dust' at her own funeral because she wanted to "go out in style."

Dwelling on death and what comes after can be quite a morbid thought process, but most of us have probably pondered what song to play at our funeral.

But it turns out that a funeral doesn't have to be a solemn affair, it can actually be quite an upbeat experience for loved ones mourning a loss.

Sandie Wood sadly passed away aged 65 and she decided to plan her own funeral with a few surprises, much to the shock of her family.

Wanting a memorable sendoff, Sandie's friend hired a troupe of dancers to perform a flashmob at the funeral to 'Another One Bites the Dust' by Queen.

The song is quite fitting for the funeral of someone with a great sense of humor, though the mourners were initially seen looking quite confused when a group of dancers began energetically performing in front of them.

Sandie's friend Sam Ryalls told the BBC: "She was one of a kind, so she left the world how she lived it. She wanted everyone to remember her funeral but not for a sad reason.

"Everyone is sad and grieving because she is not here anymore but that doesn’t mean her final day had to be that way." Sandie also had "going out in style" written across her coffin.

Though it would seem that finding a troupe of dancers willing to perform at a funeral was quite a tricky task, as Sam found out when organizing it.

"I rang so many different companies but they all said they weren’t comfortable doing it," Sam told the Sun.

Eventually, the dance group Flaming Feathers run by 36-year-old Claire Phipps agreed to take part. "We’ve been gigging for 12 years and we’ve never done a funeral," Claire said.

She went on: "We had to pretend to be part of the guests with people crying and grieving and then get up, whip our coats off, and rock out. It was really nice to do something different."

Sandie died from tongue cancer and was one of around 30,000 people that contracted hepatitis C in the 1970s and 80s after being given contaminated blood.

As reported by the BBC, the scandal is seen as the biggest treatment disaster in the history of the National Health Service (NHS).

size-full wp-image-1263192843
Protests were held over the scandal which claimed thousands of lives. Credit: Guy Corbishley / Alamy

Those suffering from hemophilia and other bleeding disorders were given blood intended to make treatment better, but it actually contained HIV and hepatitis viruses.

Demand for blood in the UK was at an all-time high, so healthcare services began importing it from the US, where it was largely given by prison inmates and drug users looking to sell their blood.

An inquiry was launched into how this disaster was allowed to happen as it resulted in thousands of deaths.

Featured image credit: Craig Holmes Premium / Alamy

Woman hired flash mob to dance to 'Another One Bites the Dust' at her own funeral

vt-author-image

By James Kay

Article saved!Article saved!

A woman hired a flash mob to dance to Queen's iconic 'Another One Bites the Dust' at her own funeral because she wanted to "go out in style."

Dwelling on death and what comes after can be quite a morbid thought process, but most of us have probably pondered what song to play at our funeral.

But it turns out that a funeral doesn't have to be a solemn affair, it can actually be quite an upbeat experience for loved ones mourning a loss.

Sandie Wood sadly passed away aged 65 and she decided to plan her own funeral with a few surprises, much to the shock of her family.

Wanting a memorable sendoff, Sandie's friend hired a troupe of dancers to perform a flashmob at the funeral to 'Another One Bites the Dust' by Queen.

The song is quite fitting for the funeral of someone with a great sense of humor, though the mourners were initially seen looking quite confused when a group of dancers began energetically performing in front of them.

Sandie's friend Sam Ryalls told the BBC: "She was one of a kind, so she left the world how she lived it. She wanted everyone to remember her funeral but not for a sad reason.

"Everyone is sad and grieving because she is not here anymore but that doesn’t mean her final day had to be that way." Sandie also had "going out in style" written across her coffin.

Though it would seem that finding a troupe of dancers willing to perform at a funeral was quite a tricky task, as Sam found out when organizing it.

"I rang so many different companies but they all said they weren’t comfortable doing it," Sam told the Sun.

Eventually, the dance group Flaming Feathers run by 36-year-old Claire Phipps agreed to take part. "We’ve been gigging for 12 years and we’ve never done a funeral," Claire said.

She went on: "We had to pretend to be part of the guests with people crying and grieving and then get up, whip our coats off, and rock out. It was really nice to do something different."

Sandie died from tongue cancer and was one of around 30,000 people that contracted hepatitis C in the 1970s and 80s after being given contaminated blood.

As reported by the BBC, the scandal is seen as the biggest treatment disaster in the history of the National Health Service (NHS).

size-full wp-image-1263192843
Protests were held over the scandal which claimed thousands of lives. Credit: Guy Corbishley / Alamy

Those suffering from hemophilia and other bleeding disorders were given blood intended to make treatment better, but it actually contained HIV and hepatitis viruses.

Demand for blood in the UK was at an all-time high, so healthcare services began importing it from the US, where it was largely given by prison inmates and drug users looking to sell their blood.

An inquiry was launched into how this disaster was allowed to happen as it resulted in thousands of deaths.

Featured image credit: Craig Holmes Premium / Alamy