Parents lost custody of their daughter over her 'embarrassing' name

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By Nasima Khatun

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After carrying your child for nine months, the last thing you'd want to do is ruin their life with a terrible name, especially one that ends up with you losing custody of them right?

Well, these parents clearly did not get the memo and ended up losing their daughter after a judge ruled that their "poor judgment" meant that they gave their child a difficult life.

The incident, which occurred back in 2008 in New Zealand, saw a nine-year-old put into court guardianship so that her name could be changed.

But what name could possibly warrant such an extreme outcome?

GettyImages-104821184.jpgCredit: Chris Ryan/Getty

Well, her parents decided to name her Talula Does the Hula From Hawaii.

Rob Murfitt, a family judge, confirmed the ruling after stating that the parents did not think about the life of the child all because of their lack of judgment.

"The court is profoundly concerned about the very poor judgment that this child's parents have shown in choosing this name. It makes a fool of the child and sets her up with a social disability and handicap, unnecessarily," he said.

In court, it was revealed that Talula actually told her peers at school that her name was 'K' just so she wouldn't have to endure any bullying, as per the child's lawyer.

"She told people her name was K because she feared being mocked and teased," Colleen MacLeod, told the court at the time.

GettyImages-1191725369.jpgCredit: SDI Productions/Getty

As per the Guardian, in his written ruling, Murfitt said names such as Stallion, Yeah Detroit, Fish and Chips, Twisty Poi, Keenan Got Lucy, and Sex Fruit were prohibited by registration officials.

Others that were actually permitted included twins called Benson and Hedges, other children called Midnight Chardonnay, Number 16 Bus Shelter, and, Violence.

Thankfully the nine-year-old ended up changing her name shortly after the ruling but it was not revealed what she changed it to due to protection and privacy regulations.

According to a news release published by the country's Department of Affairs, Prince was actually the top most declined baby name in 2023.

"The most declined name in 2023 was ‘Prince’. For the previous 13 years, ‘King’ was the most declined name. A total of 64 registrations were declined in 2023," the report read.

Other declined names include Bishop, Messiah, Major, and Princess.

GettyImages-1128377205.jpgCredit: Halfpoint Images/Getty

Speaking of the announcement, the Registrar-General of Births, Deaths, and Marriages Russell Burnard urged parents to be more careful when picking the name of their child because they are an important aspect of their identity.

"Names are a gift, and they are an important part of a person’s identity. We encourage parents to think about their child and how they might feel about their name later in life," Burnard said.

"When a name is in review, we give parents the opportunity to present the reasoning for the name. Then we make a decision, considering the balance of how the name may be perceived by the public and the Department’s obligations under the law," he added.

Featured Image Credit: Naruecha Jenthaisong/Getty

Parents lost custody of their daughter over her 'embarrassing' name

vt-author-image

By Nasima Khatun

Article saved!Article saved!

After carrying your child for nine months, the last thing you'd want to do is ruin their life with a terrible name, especially one that ends up with you losing custody of them right?

Well, these parents clearly did not get the memo and ended up losing their daughter after a judge ruled that their "poor judgment" meant that they gave their child a difficult life.

The incident, which occurred back in 2008 in New Zealand, saw a nine-year-old put into court guardianship so that her name could be changed.

But what name could possibly warrant such an extreme outcome?

GettyImages-104821184.jpgCredit: Chris Ryan/Getty

Well, her parents decided to name her Talula Does the Hula From Hawaii.

Rob Murfitt, a family judge, confirmed the ruling after stating that the parents did not think about the life of the child all because of their lack of judgment.

"The court is profoundly concerned about the very poor judgment that this child's parents have shown in choosing this name. It makes a fool of the child and sets her up with a social disability and handicap, unnecessarily," he said.

In court, it was revealed that Talula actually told her peers at school that her name was 'K' just so she wouldn't have to endure any bullying, as per the child's lawyer.

"She told people her name was K because she feared being mocked and teased," Colleen MacLeod, told the court at the time.

GettyImages-1191725369.jpgCredit: SDI Productions/Getty

As per the Guardian, in his written ruling, Murfitt said names such as Stallion, Yeah Detroit, Fish and Chips, Twisty Poi, Keenan Got Lucy, and Sex Fruit were prohibited by registration officials.

Others that were actually permitted included twins called Benson and Hedges, other children called Midnight Chardonnay, Number 16 Bus Shelter, and, Violence.

Thankfully the nine-year-old ended up changing her name shortly after the ruling but it was not revealed what she changed it to due to protection and privacy regulations.

According to a news release published by the country's Department of Affairs, Prince was actually the top most declined baby name in 2023.

"The most declined name in 2023 was ‘Prince’. For the previous 13 years, ‘King’ was the most declined name. A total of 64 registrations were declined in 2023," the report read.

Other declined names include Bishop, Messiah, Major, and Princess.

GettyImages-1128377205.jpgCredit: Halfpoint Images/Getty

Speaking of the announcement, the Registrar-General of Births, Deaths, and Marriages Russell Burnard urged parents to be more careful when picking the name of their child because they are an important aspect of their identity.

"Names are a gift, and they are an important part of a person’s identity. We encourage parents to think about their child and how they might feel about their name later in life," Burnard said.

"When a name is in review, we give parents the opportunity to present the reasoning for the name. Then we make a decision, considering the balance of how the name may be perceived by the public and the Department’s obligations under the law," he added.

Featured Image Credit: Naruecha Jenthaisong/Getty