Apple issues warning to all iPhone users following software update

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By Asiya Ali

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All iPhone users have been urged to download the latest update from Apple due to security issues found in the latest software update.

The technology giant released iOS 16.6.1 on Thursday (September 7) and recommended all users to download it as it is meant to fix a security bug that leaves iPhones vulnerable to software that steals information from a device.

The update was unveiled after a major security vulnerability was discovered in the devices, but fixing up that hole with the new software update should keep those devices secure.

"Processing a maliciously crafted image may lead to arbitrary code execution," Apple confirmed on its security pages. "Apple is aware of a report that this issue may have been actively exploited."

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Credit: Dan Kitwood / Getty

To install the urgent update, users just need to go to their iPhone Settings and select "General" followed by "Software Update".

A box about iOS 16.6.1 should appear with the message: "This update provides important security fixes and is recommended for all users." Just tap "Download and Install" to begin the update, and this could take a few minutes to complete.

As with all updates, you'll also need to make sure your phone is connected to data and is charged or plugged in if it doesn't have battery power for an update. Furthermore, Apple revealed that the update is also available for iPadOS, the operating system running on its iPads.

"For our customers' protection, Apple doesn't disclose, discuss, or confirm security issues until an investigation has occurred and patches or releases are available," the tech company added, as cited by Daily Mail.

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Credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty

The University of Toronto's Citizen Lab blew the whistle on the security issue. They said the problem was being "actively exploited" by hackers, and that all users should update immediately, per The Independent.

Citizen Lab provided more details about the software vulnerability, which is allegedly being used by cybercriminals to deliver the notorious "Pegasus" spyware, created by Israeli firm NSO Group.

Citizen Lab said in a blog post on its website that it uses an "exploit chain" method - which involves multiple exposures to compromise the victim step-by-step.

"Citizen Lab immediately disclosed our findings to Apple and assisted in their investigation," the research group said. "We expect to publish a more detailed discussion of the exploit chain in the future.

"We urge everyone to immediately update their devices," they continued. "This latest find shows once again that civil society is targeted by highly sophisticated exploits and mercenary spyware."

Lastly, the research group notified any iPhone user "who may face increased risk because of who they are or what they do" to enable Lockdown Mode - Apple's security feature first released last year.

Featured image credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty

Apple issues warning to all iPhone users following software update

vt-author-image

By Asiya Ali

Article saved!Article saved!

All iPhone users have been urged to download the latest update from Apple due to security issues found in the latest software update.

The technology giant released iOS 16.6.1 on Thursday (September 7) and recommended all users to download it as it is meant to fix a security bug that leaves iPhones vulnerable to software that steals information from a device.

The update was unveiled after a major security vulnerability was discovered in the devices, but fixing up that hole with the new software update should keep those devices secure.

"Processing a maliciously crafted image may lead to arbitrary code execution," Apple confirmed on its security pages. "Apple is aware of a report that this issue may have been actively exploited."

wp-image-1263227611 size-full
Credit: Dan Kitwood / Getty

To install the urgent update, users just need to go to their iPhone Settings and select "General" followed by "Software Update".

A box about iOS 16.6.1 should appear with the message: "This update provides important security fixes and is recommended for all users." Just tap "Download and Install" to begin the update, and this could take a few minutes to complete.

As with all updates, you'll also need to make sure your phone is connected to data and is charged or plugged in if it doesn't have battery power for an update. Furthermore, Apple revealed that the update is also available for iPadOS, the operating system running on its iPads.

"For our customers' protection, Apple doesn't disclose, discuss, or confirm security issues until an investigation has occurred and patches or releases are available," the tech company added, as cited by Daily Mail.

wp-image-1263227610 size-full
Credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty

The University of Toronto's Citizen Lab blew the whistle on the security issue. They said the problem was being "actively exploited" by hackers, and that all users should update immediately, per The Independent.

Citizen Lab provided more details about the software vulnerability, which is allegedly being used by cybercriminals to deliver the notorious "Pegasus" spyware, created by Israeli firm NSO Group.

Citizen Lab said in a blog post on its website that it uses an "exploit chain" method - which involves multiple exposures to compromise the victim step-by-step.

"Citizen Lab immediately disclosed our findings to Apple and assisted in their investigation," the research group said. "We expect to publish a more detailed discussion of the exploit chain in the future.

"We urge everyone to immediately update their devices," they continued. "This latest find shows once again that civil society is targeted by highly sophisticated exploits and mercenary spyware."

Lastly, the research group notified any iPhone user "who may face increased risk because of who they are or what they do" to enable Lockdown Mode - Apple's security feature first released last year.

Featured image credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty