Bradley Cooper says he'd do a 'Hangover 4' in 'an instant'

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By Asiya Ali

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Bradley Cooper has made it clear that he is open to doing a Hangover 4 movie, a decade after the raunchy comedy franchise came to a close.

One of the earliest hits in the 48-year-old Academy Award-winning star's career was 2009's The Hangover, in which he played elementary school teacher Phil Wenneck opposite Ed Helms as Stu Price and Zach Galifianakis as Alan Garner.

The group searches for their missing friend Doug (portrayed by Justin Bartha) after he disappears during a bachelor party celebration in Las Vegas. The only problem? They can't remember anything from the night.

The hilarious flick made a whopping $469.3 million off its $35 million budget and quickly spawned two sequels, 2011's The Hangover Part II and 2013's The Hangover Part III.

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The cast of Hangover (L-R) director Todd Phillips, Justin Bartha, Zach Galifianakis, Bradley Cooper, and Heather Graham.uni Credit: Robert Marquardt / Getty

The filmmaker recently sat down for a conversation with The New Yorker Radio Hour's host David Remnick to promote the new Leonard Bernstein biopic, Maestro.

Cooper revealed that despite his recent transition into more serious roles, he isn't opposed to going back to his comedy days, and expressed enthusiasm about the possibility of returning to the Hangover franchise.

"I would probably do Hangover 4 in an instant," he revealed. "Just because I love Todd [Phillips], I love Zach [Galifianakis], I love Ed [Helms] so much, I probably would."

However, the star actor threw cold water on the possibility of a Hangover 4 coming anytime soon as he added, "I don't think [director Todd Phillips is] is ever going to do that."

The Star Is Born actor remarked that although he no longer takes on humorous roles, he is enjoying what he is currently doing with his career more than ever.

While many might think the more serious films are "exhausting," Cooper said he doesn’t see it that way, explaining: "There’s nothing more fun that I've experienced than Maestro and a Star is Born."

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Bradley Cooper starred as the Jewish composer in the new movie, Maestro. Credit: Jason Mendez / Getty

In his new film Maestro, Cooper plays the late composer and music director of the New York Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein. This role required years of research, a handful of prosthetics, and hours of makeup to depict Bernstein.

However, the use of prosthetics for Cooper's transition to Bernstein - a Jewish man - sparked some backlash as some people cited concerns about "Jewface", a term that negatively characterizes stereotypical or inauthentic portrayals of Jewish people.

On Tuesday (November 21), the Silver Linings Playbook star opened up about the controversy during an interview on CBS Mornings, stating: "I thought, 'Maybe we don’t need to do it.'"

"But it’s all about balance, and, you know, my lips are nothing like Lenny’s, and my chin. And so we had that, and it just didn’t look right [without the prosthetic]," he continued. "So when he’s young we have a prosthetic here, and it just moves out, so by the time he’s older, it's the whole face."

"So we just had to do it; otherwise, I wouldn’t believe he’s a human being," Cooper added, motioning to his face.

Bernstein's daughter Jamie, the oldest of his three children, opened up about Cooper's performance of her father, telling PEOPLE: "We had no idea that Bradley had this level of intensity and commitment about a thing when he got it in his grip."

"There are even certain moments in the film, when he's in motion, where he looks so exactly like our dad it makes us gasp," she added.

Maestro will be available to stream on Netflix from December 20.

Featured image credit: Gilbert Flores / Getty

Bradley Cooper says he'd do a 'Hangover 4' in 'an instant'

vt-author-image

By Asiya Ali

Article saved!Article saved!

Bradley Cooper has made it clear that he is open to doing a Hangover 4 movie, a decade after the raunchy comedy franchise came to a close.

One of the earliest hits in the 48-year-old Academy Award-winning star's career was 2009's The Hangover, in which he played elementary school teacher Phil Wenneck opposite Ed Helms as Stu Price and Zach Galifianakis as Alan Garner.

The group searches for their missing friend Doug (portrayed by Justin Bartha) after he disappears during a bachelor party celebration in Las Vegas. The only problem? They can't remember anything from the night.

The hilarious flick made a whopping $469.3 million off its $35 million budget and quickly spawned two sequels, 2011's The Hangover Part II and 2013's The Hangover Part III.

wp-image-1263238139 size-full
The cast of Hangover (L-R) director Todd Phillips, Justin Bartha, Zach Galifianakis, Bradley Cooper, and Heather Graham.uni Credit: Robert Marquardt / Getty

The filmmaker recently sat down for a conversation with The New Yorker Radio Hour's host David Remnick to promote the new Leonard Bernstein biopic, Maestro.

Cooper revealed that despite his recent transition into more serious roles, he isn't opposed to going back to his comedy days, and expressed enthusiasm about the possibility of returning to the Hangover franchise.

"I would probably do Hangover 4 in an instant," he revealed. "Just because I love Todd [Phillips], I love Zach [Galifianakis], I love Ed [Helms] so much, I probably would."

However, the star actor threw cold water on the possibility of a Hangover 4 coming anytime soon as he added, "I don't think [director Todd Phillips is] is ever going to do that."

The Star Is Born actor remarked that although he no longer takes on humorous roles, he is enjoying what he is currently doing with his career more than ever.

While many might think the more serious films are "exhausting," Cooper said he doesn’t see it that way, explaining: "There’s nothing more fun that I've experienced than Maestro and a Star is Born."

wp-image-1263238141 size-full
Bradley Cooper starred as the Jewish composer in the new movie, Maestro. Credit: Jason Mendez / Getty

In his new film Maestro, Cooper plays the late composer and music director of the New York Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein. This role required years of research, a handful of prosthetics, and hours of makeup to depict Bernstein.

However, the use of prosthetics for Cooper's transition to Bernstein - a Jewish man - sparked some backlash as some people cited concerns about "Jewface", a term that negatively characterizes stereotypical or inauthentic portrayals of Jewish people.

On Tuesday (November 21), the Silver Linings Playbook star opened up about the controversy during an interview on CBS Mornings, stating: "I thought, 'Maybe we don’t need to do it.'"

"But it’s all about balance, and, you know, my lips are nothing like Lenny’s, and my chin. And so we had that, and it just didn’t look right [without the prosthetic]," he continued. "So when he’s young we have a prosthetic here, and it just moves out, so by the time he’s older, it's the whole face."

"So we just had to do it; otherwise, I wouldn’t believe he’s a human being," Cooper added, motioning to his face.

Bernstein's daughter Jamie, the oldest of his three children, opened up about Cooper's performance of her father, telling PEOPLE: "We had no idea that Bradley had this level of intensity and commitment about a thing when he got it in his grip."

"There are even certain moments in the film, when he's in motion, where he looks so exactly like our dad it makes us gasp," she added.

Maestro will be available to stream on Netflix from December 20.

Featured image credit: Gilbert Flores / Getty