Legendary chat show host Michael Parkinson's cause of death confirmed

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By VT

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Sir Michael Parkinson's cause of death has been confirmed weeks after the British national treasure passed away.

The legendary chat show host died "peacefully" at home surrounded by his family on August 16, following a "brief illness," according to his family.

Although the cause of death had been previously undisclosed, it has now been confirmed by the Daily Express that the star died due to "frailty of old age."

Parkinson's illustrious career spanned an incredible seven decades and involved interviewing some of the world's biggest celebrities like Muhammad Ali, Sir Elton John, and Dame Helen Mirren, among countless others. His son Michael registered his father's death at Maidenhead Town Hall on August 18 and revealed the emotional toll of losing a public figure father in a BBC Radio 4's Last Word interview.

"The difficulty with having a public figure as a father is that you feel you can't grieve until everyone else has," his son said. "Your experience is overshadowed by noise and an outpouring that you feel almost that you have to step back from and allow that to happen."

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Sir Michael Parkinson sadly passed away a couple weeks ago. Credit: Staff/The People/Mirrorpix/Getty

At the time of Parkinson's death, a flood of tributes poured in from Sir Elton John, Sir Michael Caine, and Sir David Attenborough, who remarked that the Yorkshire TV legend "always wanted the interviewee to shine."

The family requested privacy, stating: "After a brief illness Sir Michael Parkinson passed away peacefully at home last night in the company of his family."

Starting his television journey in 1971 on BBC, Parkinson's eponymous show captivated millions during its initial 11-year run, generating hundreds of episodes that became a part of television history. With his unique interview style, he set a gold standard for talk shows, making him a household name in the UK and beyond.

Born as the son of a miner with a love for cricket, Parkinson had humble beginnings. He began his career in journalism by collecting sports results for a local newspaper. Following a two-year service in the British Army, he took his first big journalistic step with the Manchester Guardian, which later became The Guardian. His writing skills soon attracted the attention of the Daily Express in London, propelling him into the mainstream world of print media.

In 2013, the talk show icon disclosed that he was undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer but received an all-clear from his medical team two years later. After his stint in print journalism, he transitioned to television, becoming a current affairs presenter and reporter for both Granada News and the BBC. This move eventually led him to host his much-loved show on BBC One.

As the world mourns this incredible loss, Parkinson's impact on journalism and television remains undiminished. His unique interviewing style and commitment to letting "the interviewee shine" have solidified his lasting legacy.

Featured image credit: Ron Burton/Daily Mirror/Mirrorpix/Getty

Legendary chat show host Michael Parkinson's cause of death confirmed

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

Sir Michael Parkinson's cause of death has been confirmed weeks after the British national treasure passed away.

The legendary chat show host died "peacefully" at home surrounded by his family on August 16, following a "brief illness," according to his family.

Although the cause of death had been previously undisclosed, it has now been confirmed by the Daily Express that the star died due to "frailty of old age."

Parkinson's illustrious career spanned an incredible seven decades and involved interviewing some of the world's biggest celebrities like Muhammad Ali, Sir Elton John, and Dame Helen Mirren, among countless others. His son Michael registered his father's death at Maidenhead Town Hall on August 18 and revealed the emotional toll of losing a public figure father in a BBC Radio 4's Last Word interview.

"The difficulty with having a public figure as a father is that you feel you can't grieve until everyone else has," his son said. "Your experience is overshadowed by noise and an outpouring that you feel almost that you have to step back from and allow that to happen."

wp-image-1263224872 size-full
Sir Michael Parkinson sadly passed away a couple weeks ago. Credit: Staff/The People/Mirrorpix/Getty

At the time of Parkinson's death, a flood of tributes poured in from Sir Elton John, Sir Michael Caine, and Sir David Attenborough, who remarked that the Yorkshire TV legend "always wanted the interviewee to shine."

The family requested privacy, stating: "After a brief illness Sir Michael Parkinson passed away peacefully at home last night in the company of his family."

Starting his television journey in 1971 on BBC, Parkinson's eponymous show captivated millions during its initial 11-year run, generating hundreds of episodes that became a part of television history. With his unique interview style, he set a gold standard for talk shows, making him a household name in the UK and beyond.

Born as the son of a miner with a love for cricket, Parkinson had humble beginnings. He began his career in journalism by collecting sports results for a local newspaper. Following a two-year service in the British Army, he took his first big journalistic step with the Manchester Guardian, which later became The Guardian. His writing skills soon attracted the attention of the Daily Express in London, propelling him into the mainstream world of print media.

In 2013, the talk show icon disclosed that he was undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer but received an all-clear from his medical team two years later. After his stint in print journalism, he transitioned to television, becoming a current affairs presenter and reporter for both Granada News and the BBC. This move eventually led him to host his much-loved show on BBC One.

As the world mourns this incredible loss, Parkinson's impact on journalism and television remains undiminished. His unique interviewing style and commitment to letting "the interviewee shine" have solidified his lasting legacy.

Featured image credit: Ron Burton/Daily Mirror/Mirrorpix/Getty