Sinéad O’Connor's autopsy has been completed

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By VT

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In the wake of the heartbreaking news of Sinéad O'Connor's death at the age of 56, her family has received her remains following an autopsy, as reported by the Irish Times.

The Irish singer-songwriter, best known for her soul-stirring rendition of 'Nothing Compares 2 U', left a significant mark on the music world.

John Thompson, clerk of the London Inner South district for Southwark Coroners Court, confirmed the completion of O'Connor's autopsy, stating that the report might not be available for several weeks. Further information regarding her passing will be shared with the public only if an inquest into her death is opened.

O'Connor's death on July 26 isn't being treated as suspicious by authorities. Her family made a announcement last week, saying: "It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our beloved Sinéad. Her family and friends are devastated and have requested privacy at this very difficult time."

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In the wake of the heartbreaking news of Sinéad O'Connor's death at the age of only 56, her family has received her remains following an autopsy. Credit: Lindsey Best/Getty

O'Connor's impactful journey in the music industry began in 1987 with her debut album, The Lion and the Cobra, at the age of 20. The Dublin-born artist released 10 studio albums over her career, earning a Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Performance for 'I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got' in 1991.

Despite her talent, O'Connor's career wasn't without controversy. She was banned from NBC after tearing up a photo of Pope John Paul II during a 1992 guest appearance on Saturday Night Live, initially claimed as a protest against the Catholic Church's child sex abuse scandals.

However, in her 2021 memoir Rememberings, O'Connor revealed that her intention was to destroy her mother's photo of the pope, which she felt represented lies and abuse.

O'Connor faced significant hardship from an early age. Her parents divorced when she was only eight years old, and she later spoke of suffering physical abuse, which she vividly portrayed in her song 'Fire on Babylon.' Throughout her life, she became a powerful advocate for children who suffered abuse.

In a personal shift, O'Connor converted to Islam in 2018, changing her name to Shuhada’ Sadaqat. Her untimely death comes merely 18 months after the tragic suicide of her 17-year-old son, Shane. O'Connor had been openly struggling with her grief, sharing emotionally raw posts on social media platform X, formerly known as Twitter.

She is survived by her three children, Jake Reynolds, 36, Roisin Waters, 27, and Yeshua Bonadio, 16. As the world mourns her passing, O'Connor's music and her influential legacy continue to reverberate in the hearts of fans worldwide.

Our thoughts remain with her fans, family and loved ones at this time.

Featured image credit: Andrew Chin / Getty

Sinéad O’Connor's autopsy has been completed

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

In the wake of the heartbreaking news of Sinéad O'Connor's death at the age of 56, her family has received her remains following an autopsy, as reported by the Irish Times.

The Irish singer-songwriter, best known for her soul-stirring rendition of 'Nothing Compares 2 U', left a significant mark on the music world.

John Thompson, clerk of the London Inner South district for Southwark Coroners Court, confirmed the completion of O'Connor's autopsy, stating that the report might not be available for several weeks. Further information regarding her passing will be shared with the public only if an inquest into her death is opened.

O'Connor's death on July 26 isn't being treated as suspicious by authorities. Her family made a announcement last week, saying: "It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our beloved Sinéad. Her family and friends are devastated and have requested privacy at this very difficult time."

size-full wp-image-1263222647
In the wake of the heartbreaking news of Sinéad O'Connor's death at the age of only 56, her family has received her remains following an autopsy. Credit: Lindsey Best/Getty

O'Connor's impactful journey in the music industry began in 1987 with her debut album, The Lion and the Cobra, at the age of 20. The Dublin-born artist released 10 studio albums over her career, earning a Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Performance for 'I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got' in 1991.

Despite her talent, O'Connor's career wasn't without controversy. She was banned from NBC after tearing up a photo of Pope John Paul II during a 1992 guest appearance on Saturday Night Live, initially claimed as a protest against the Catholic Church's child sex abuse scandals.

However, in her 2021 memoir Rememberings, O'Connor revealed that her intention was to destroy her mother's photo of the pope, which she felt represented lies and abuse.

O'Connor faced significant hardship from an early age. Her parents divorced when she was only eight years old, and she later spoke of suffering physical abuse, which she vividly portrayed in her song 'Fire on Babylon.' Throughout her life, she became a powerful advocate for children who suffered abuse.

In a personal shift, O'Connor converted to Islam in 2018, changing her name to Shuhada’ Sadaqat. Her untimely death comes merely 18 months after the tragic suicide of her 17-year-old son, Shane. O'Connor had been openly struggling with her grief, sharing emotionally raw posts on social media platform X, formerly known as Twitter.

She is survived by her three children, Jake Reynolds, 36, Roisin Waters, 27, and Yeshua Bonadio, 16. As the world mourns her passing, O'Connor's music and her influential legacy continue to reverberate in the hearts of fans worldwide.

Our thoughts remain with her fans, family and loved ones at this time.

Featured image credit: Andrew Chin / Getty