Courteney Cox reveals why she's 'be really afraid' to star in another sitcom

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By Carina Murphy

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She may have starred in the biggest sitcom of all time - but Courtney Cox has no plans to return to the world of 30-minute comedy shows anytime soon.

The Friends star opened up about her career during an appearance on the Just for Variety with Marc Malkin podcast.

Cox, 57, explained that she still gets pitched a lot of sitcom ideas - but that she's unimpressed by the quality of modern shows utilizing the 'situational comedy' format.

"Usually they’re not challenging enough," she said, before going on to say that - in her opinion - modern sitcoms just aren't that funny.

"I find sitcoms just not that funny anymore. I don't know why. I feel bad to say that," said the actor.

[[imagecaption|| Courtney Cox, Jennifer Anniston and Lisa Kudrow in Friends. Credit: AF archive / Alamy]]

Cox also explained that after the unprecedented success of Friends, she was left feeling hesitant about signing on to other sitcom projects.

"I come from such an iconic sitcom where it still holds up and it's so funny and it was so relevant to everyone. I'd be really afraid to do another sitcom because I wouldn't want to ever be compared to Friends," she said.

Friends ended in 2004, and Cox has veered away from TV projects ever since - with a few notable exceptions. She starred in six seasons of the sitcom Cougar Town as divorced real estate agent Jules Cobb.

Her latest project will see her back on the small screen in the horror-comedy show Shining Vale, in which she plays an erotic fiction writer who moves to the country and becomes convinced she's seeing ghosts.

[[imagecaption|| Courtney Cox in 2018. Credit: Sipa US / Alamy]]

Elsewhere on the podcast, Cox admitted to feeling irrelevant after Cougar Town ended, and she took time off from acting to focus on her family.

"I didn’t feel very relevant," she said, adding: "I think [it was] out of sight, out of mind. And yeah, I think a lot of it was my fault, but I think also once I wasn’t driven, I think they probably forgot about me for a while."

Featured Image Credit: MediaPunch Inc / Alamy

Courteney Cox reveals why she's 'be really afraid' to star in another sitcom

vt-author-image

By Carina Murphy

Article saved!Article saved!

She may have starred in the biggest sitcom of all time - but Courtney Cox has no plans to return to the world of 30-minute comedy shows anytime soon.

The Friends star opened up about her career during an appearance on the Just for Variety with Marc Malkin podcast.

Cox, 57, explained that she still gets pitched a lot of sitcom ideas - but that she's unimpressed by the quality of modern shows utilizing the 'situational comedy' format.

"Usually they’re not challenging enough," she said, before going on to say that - in her opinion - modern sitcoms just aren't that funny.

"I find sitcoms just not that funny anymore. I don't know why. I feel bad to say that," said the actor.

[[imagecaption|| Courtney Cox, Jennifer Anniston and Lisa Kudrow in Friends. Credit: AF archive / Alamy]]

Cox also explained that after the unprecedented success of Friends, she was left feeling hesitant about signing on to other sitcom projects.

"I come from such an iconic sitcom where it still holds up and it's so funny and it was so relevant to everyone. I'd be really afraid to do another sitcom because I wouldn't want to ever be compared to Friends," she said.

Friends ended in 2004, and Cox has veered away from TV projects ever since - with a few notable exceptions. She starred in six seasons of the sitcom Cougar Town as divorced real estate agent Jules Cobb.

Her latest project will see her back on the small screen in the horror-comedy show Shining Vale, in which she plays an erotic fiction writer who moves to the country and becomes convinced she's seeing ghosts.

[[imagecaption|| Courtney Cox in 2018. Credit: Sipa US / Alamy]]

Elsewhere on the podcast, Cox admitted to feeling irrelevant after Cougar Town ended, and she took time off from acting to focus on her family.

"I didn’t feel very relevant," she said, adding: "I think [it was] out of sight, out of mind. And yeah, I think a lot of it was my fault, but I think also once I wasn’t driven, I think they probably forgot about me for a while."

Featured Image Credit: MediaPunch Inc / Alamy