The ending of 'Friends' is a lot darker than you remember it being

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By VT

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There are certain movies and TV shows from your youth that, whether you still watch them or not, have a place in your heart. So it can be difficult to look back on them and see how outdated they are, or notice that they contain a ton of weird undercurrents which you completely missed when you were younger.

For instance, I'm sure a Christmas family favorite for a lot of you was The Santa Clause. It has an interesting premise, some laughs, and a good message at its core. But when you look into it, it's actually pretty damn creepy. One Twitter user got down to the rules of that particular universe, describing it as "the most stone-cold brutal, horrific Christmas film ever made". And once you read their theory, it's hard to disagree.

Similarly, there are some things that don't quite sit right with the popular sitcom Friends in retrospect. For one, there are plenty of younger viewers seeing the show for the first time who are noticing it doesn't quite match up with modern views on gender, sexuality, race and body image. With its feet firmly set in mainstream 90s beliefs, there are a lot of things that simply don't fly in today's world.

Despite this, actor Matt Le Blanc rejected these criticisms altogether, explaining that the show steered clear of "any sort of political content". "Friends was about themes that stand the test of time," he said, "trust, love, relationships, betrayal, family and things like that".

[[instagramwidget||https://www.instagram.com/p/BZttmJxAXln/?hl=en&taken-by=mleblanc]]

Yet there's something new that fans are discovering about the show - and it's about the ending. When things wrapped up in 2004, we saw the friends say goodbye to their iconic New York City apartment and move on with their lives. But did it work out well for everyone?

In a list of secretly depressing TV show endings, on the website Ranker, things turned out well for almost everyone. Ross and Rachel got together, Monica and Chandler have twin girls and are moving to a nice house outside of the city, and Phoebe has married the love of her life, Mike. But what about Joey?

"By the end of the series," the site wrote, "Joey is in his late 30s, and is totally alone, even though he seems focused on finding true love."

"Viewers get the vibe that Joey's just along for the ride, so his future doesn't really matter, but that's kind of tragic when you think about it.

"To make things worse, Joey - the two-season spin-off that focuses on the struggling actor - sees him in a one-sided relationship with a woman who doesn't share his desire to get married. Poor guy."

When you think about it, they do kind of breeze over the fact that the only thing that has really changed for Joey over the course of the show is that he got older (and dumber).

While we're on the subject of secretly depressing endings, was Ross (who is a bit of a jerk, let's be honest) worth Rachel giving up the job of a lifetime for?

The ending of 'Friends' is a lot darker than you remember it being

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

There are certain movies and TV shows from your youth that, whether you still watch them or not, have a place in your heart. So it can be difficult to look back on them and see how outdated they are, or notice that they contain a ton of weird undercurrents which you completely missed when you were younger.

For instance, I'm sure a Christmas family favorite for a lot of you was The Santa Clause. It has an interesting premise, some laughs, and a good message at its core. But when you look into it, it's actually pretty damn creepy. One Twitter user got down to the rules of that particular universe, describing it as "the most stone-cold brutal, horrific Christmas film ever made". And once you read their theory, it's hard to disagree.

Similarly, there are some things that don't quite sit right with the popular sitcom Friends in retrospect. For one, there are plenty of younger viewers seeing the show for the first time who are noticing it doesn't quite match up with modern views on gender, sexuality, race and body image. With its feet firmly set in mainstream 90s beliefs, there are a lot of things that simply don't fly in today's world.

Despite this, actor Matt Le Blanc rejected these criticisms altogether, explaining that the show steered clear of "any sort of political content". "Friends was about themes that stand the test of time," he said, "trust, love, relationships, betrayal, family and things like that".

[[instagramwidget||https://www.instagram.com/p/BZttmJxAXln/?hl=en&taken-by=mleblanc]]

Yet there's something new that fans are discovering about the show - and it's about the ending. When things wrapped up in 2004, we saw the friends say goodbye to their iconic New York City apartment and move on with their lives. But did it work out well for everyone?

In a list of secretly depressing TV show endings, on the website Ranker, things turned out well for almost everyone. Ross and Rachel got together, Monica and Chandler have twin girls and are moving to a nice house outside of the city, and Phoebe has married the love of her life, Mike. But what about Joey?

"By the end of the series," the site wrote, "Joey is in his late 30s, and is totally alone, even though he seems focused on finding true love."

"Viewers get the vibe that Joey's just along for the ride, so his future doesn't really matter, but that's kind of tragic when you think about it.

"To make things worse, Joey - the two-season spin-off that focuses on the struggling actor - sees him in a one-sided relationship with a woman who doesn't share his desire to get married. Poor guy."

When you think about it, they do kind of breeze over the fact that the only thing that has really changed for Joey over the course of the show is that he got older (and dumber).

While we're on the subject of secretly depressing endings, was Ross (who is a bit of a jerk, let's be honest) worth Rachel giving up the job of a lifetime for?