'The Simpsons' producer apologizes after killing off a long-standing character

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By James Kay

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Following the death of a long-standing character on The Simpsons, a producer on the show has apologized to all the heartbroken fans.

The Simpsons has been a part of many of our lives for decades now, and the beloved show has no signs of slowing down.

First debuted as a cartoon short on the Tracy Ullman Show in 1987, it has arguably become the most iconic animated series of all time.

Now in its 35th season and with a confirmed renewal for season 36, The Simpsons has surpassed the 800-episode milestone.


But as shows go on, there needs to be some shocking moments to keep the audience engaged... I mean, who could forget Maude Flanders being pelted to her death by a t-shirt cannon?

The most recent character to meet their end was Larry the Barfly, also known as Larry Dalrymple.

Often seen clad in a dark red jacket, Larry would frequent Moe's Tavern, sharing the screen with Homer, Barney, Lenny, and Carl, albeit in a largely silent role.

However, in a recent episode titled 'Cremains the Day', viewers were left stunned as Larry - voiced by Harry Shearer since his debut in 1989 - tragically passed away at the bar.

His sudden death prompted reflections from characters like Homer, Moe, Carl, and Lenny, who attended his funeral, grappling with the realization that they knew little about their late friend.

Larry the Barfly and Sam the Barfly in The Simpsons.Larry (left) propping up the bar in Moe's Tavern. Credit: Fox

Sad, right?

Well, in the aftermath of Larry's death, fans flooded social media with their thoughts and many were pretty heartbroken after losing a long-standing character.


Tim Long, co-executive producer of the long-running sitcom, opened up to TMZ about the decision to kill off Larry, revealing that the creative team had intended for the character's death to pack a punch, despite his relatively minor presence on the show.

They certainly achieved that.

Long underscored the significance of Larry's departure, noting that deaths are rare occurrences in the world of The Simpsons, amplifying their impact when they do occur.

The producer said he was "sorry" to the fans who took Larry's death hard, but that it's a testament to the show that background characters can be killed off and it still resonates with the audience.

Long compared the reaction of Simpsons fans to that of the Flintstones, joking that the latter group might not have reacted similarly if a character met a similar fate.

However, Long urged fans not to despair, reassuring them that the loss of Larry pales in comparison to the hypothetical death of more major characters like Barney or Moe.

In the wake of the emotional episode, Simpsons writer Matt Selman paid tribute to the creative team behind the poignant storytelling, acknowledging the impact of Larry's departure.

"'Cremains of the Day' — @TheSimpsons episode 765, brilliantly written by John Frink, stunningly co-run by @mrtimlong & daringly directed by Gabriel DeFrancesco," he said.

Farewell, Larry.

Featured image credit: Rodin Eckenroth/Getty

'The Simpsons' producer apologizes after killing off a long-standing character

vt-author-image

By James Kay

Article saved!Article saved!

Following the death of a long-standing character on The Simpsons, a producer on the show has apologized to all the heartbroken fans.

The Simpsons has been a part of many of our lives for decades now, and the beloved show has no signs of slowing down.

First debuted as a cartoon short on the Tracy Ullman Show in 1987, it has arguably become the most iconic animated series of all time.

Now in its 35th season and with a confirmed renewal for season 36, The Simpsons has surpassed the 800-episode milestone.


But as shows go on, there needs to be some shocking moments to keep the audience engaged... I mean, who could forget Maude Flanders being pelted to her death by a t-shirt cannon?

The most recent character to meet their end was Larry the Barfly, also known as Larry Dalrymple.

Often seen clad in a dark red jacket, Larry would frequent Moe's Tavern, sharing the screen with Homer, Barney, Lenny, and Carl, albeit in a largely silent role.

However, in a recent episode titled 'Cremains the Day', viewers were left stunned as Larry - voiced by Harry Shearer since his debut in 1989 - tragically passed away at the bar.

His sudden death prompted reflections from characters like Homer, Moe, Carl, and Lenny, who attended his funeral, grappling with the realization that they knew little about their late friend.

Larry the Barfly and Sam the Barfly in The Simpsons.Larry (left) propping up the bar in Moe's Tavern. Credit: Fox

Sad, right?

Well, in the aftermath of Larry's death, fans flooded social media with their thoughts and many were pretty heartbroken after losing a long-standing character.


Tim Long, co-executive producer of the long-running sitcom, opened up to TMZ about the decision to kill off Larry, revealing that the creative team had intended for the character's death to pack a punch, despite his relatively minor presence on the show.

They certainly achieved that.

Long underscored the significance of Larry's departure, noting that deaths are rare occurrences in the world of The Simpsons, amplifying their impact when they do occur.

The producer said he was "sorry" to the fans who took Larry's death hard, but that it's a testament to the show that background characters can be killed off and it still resonates with the audience.

Long compared the reaction of Simpsons fans to that of the Flintstones, joking that the latter group might not have reacted similarly if a character met a similar fate.

However, Long urged fans not to despair, reassuring them that the loss of Larry pales in comparison to the hypothetical death of more major characters like Barney or Moe.

In the wake of the emotional episode, Simpsons writer Matt Selman paid tribute to the creative team behind the poignant storytelling, acknowledging the impact of Larry's departure.

"'Cremains of the Day' — @TheSimpsons episode 765, brilliantly written by John Frink, stunningly co-run by @mrtimlong & daringly directed by Gabriel DeFrancesco," he said.

Farewell, Larry.

Featured image credit: Rodin Eckenroth/Getty