J.K. Rowling responds to critic who called her a 'tragic, sad figure'

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By Asiya Ali

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J.K. Rowling has hit back at a critic that slammed her as a "tragic and sad figure" over her views on transgender issues.

As you probably know by now, the 57-year-old Harry Potter novelist became a controversial figure outside of her books for her stance on gender identity rights.

She was first accused of transphobia three years ago after she took issue with an op-ed that discussed "people who menstruate," and did not use the word "woman."

Rowling shared a post on Twitter that read: "'People who menstruate.' I’m sure there used to be a word for those people. Someone help me out. Wumben? Wimpund? Woomud?"

Many of the famous franchise's stars began distancing themselves from the writer, including Daniel Radcliffe who shared a message through The Trevor Project - a non-profit organization for the LGBTQ+ community - that read: "Transgender women are women.

"Any statement to the contrary erases the identity and dignity of transgender people and goes against all advice given by professional healthcare associations who have far more expertise on this subject matter than either Jo or I," he added.

Amid continuing discussions over her viewpoints on the community, Rowling recently took to Twitter to share a screenshot of a ruthless message that appears to have been sent to her on the platform.

The person wrote: "You really have become a rather tragic and sad figure, haven't you? All that money. All that success, and yet most will remember you for being little more than a vituperative giga-troll and the de facto leader of a global transphobic cult."

She mockingly responded to the tweet by penning: "Used to think I wanted just name and dates on my gravestone, but 'vituperative giga-troll' would really make me stand out in the cemetery."

Rowling's response comes after fans took to social media to voice their concerns about her involvement in the forthcoming Harry Potter series - which will premiere on Max, currently branded as HBO Max.

According to the press release, the series will be a "faithful and authentic adaptation" of the beloved Harry Potter franchise by the author, who will also serve as the executive producer. The show is expected to be a departure from the original films as it will have a whole new cast that "will lead a new generation of fandom".

During a Q&A with the press, the CEO of HBO and Max Content, Casey Bloys, abstained from addressing the backlash towards Rowling being the executive producer of the adaptation.

"[Rowling] will be involved. She's an executive producer on the show. Her insights are going to be helpful on that," he said, as reported by Variety. "The TV show is new and we're excited about that, but, remember, we've been in the 'Potter' business for 20 years. This is not a new decision for us, we're very comfortable being in the 'Potter' business."

The CEO also refused to comment on her alleged transphobic views when asked how they may affect the ability to find talent for the series, stating: "No, I don’t think this is the forum. That’s a very online conversation, very nuanced and complicated, and not something we’re going to get into."

"Our priority is what’s on the screen," Bloys continued. "Obviously, the 'Harry Potter' story is incredibly affirmative and positive and about love and self-acceptance. That’s our priority - what’s on screen."

Featured image credit: PA Images / Alamy

J.K. Rowling responds to critic who called her a 'tragic, sad figure'

vt-author-image

By Asiya Ali

Article saved!Article saved!

J.K. Rowling has hit back at a critic that slammed her as a "tragic and sad figure" over her views on transgender issues.

As you probably know by now, the 57-year-old Harry Potter novelist became a controversial figure outside of her books for her stance on gender identity rights.

She was first accused of transphobia three years ago after she took issue with an op-ed that discussed "people who menstruate," and did not use the word "woman."

Rowling shared a post on Twitter that read: "'People who menstruate.' I’m sure there used to be a word for those people. Someone help me out. Wumben? Wimpund? Woomud?"

Many of the famous franchise's stars began distancing themselves from the writer, including Daniel Radcliffe who shared a message through The Trevor Project - a non-profit organization for the LGBTQ+ community - that read: "Transgender women are women.

"Any statement to the contrary erases the identity and dignity of transgender people and goes against all advice given by professional healthcare associations who have far more expertise on this subject matter than either Jo or I," he added.

Amid continuing discussions over her viewpoints on the community, Rowling recently took to Twitter to share a screenshot of a ruthless message that appears to have been sent to her on the platform.

The person wrote: "You really have become a rather tragic and sad figure, haven't you? All that money. All that success, and yet most will remember you for being little more than a vituperative giga-troll and the de facto leader of a global transphobic cult."

She mockingly responded to the tweet by penning: "Used to think I wanted just name and dates on my gravestone, but 'vituperative giga-troll' would really make me stand out in the cemetery."

Rowling's response comes after fans took to social media to voice their concerns about her involvement in the forthcoming Harry Potter series - which will premiere on Max, currently branded as HBO Max.

According to the press release, the series will be a "faithful and authentic adaptation" of the beloved Harry Potter franchise by the author, who will also serve as the executive producer. The show is expected to be a departure from the original films as it will have a whole new cast that "will lead a new generation of fandom".

During a Q&A with the press, the CEO of HBO and Max Content, Casey Bloys, abstained from addressing the backlash towards Rowling being the executive producer of the adaptation.

"[Rowling] will be involved. She's an executive producer on the show. Her insights are going to be helpful on that," he said, as reported by Variety. "The TV show is new and we're excited about that, but, remember, we've been in the 'Potter' business for 20 years. This is not a new decision for us, we're very comfortable being in the 'Potter' business."

The CEO also refused to comment on her alleged transphobic views when asked how they may affect the ability to find talent for the series, stating: "No, I don’t think this is the forum. That’s a very online conversation, very nuanced and complicated, and not something we’re going to get into."

"Our priority is what’s on the screen," Bloys continued. "Obviously, the 'Harry Potter' story is incredibly affirmative and positive and about love and self-acceptance. That’s our priority - what’s on screen."

Featured image credit: PA Images / Alamy