People are pointing out all the 'red flags' in Christmas classic 'Love Actually'

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By Nasima Khatun

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When you think of iconic Christmas films, what comes to mind? Home Alone? Obviously. Elf? Yeah, maybe. And of course, my personal favorite, Love Actually.

Hailed as one of the best festive rom-coms in history, Love Actually follows the "lives of eight very different couples in dealing with their love lives in various loosely interrelated tales all set during a frantic month before Christmas in London, England."

With Hugh Grant and Martine McCutcheon starring in the 2003 movie alongside Liam Neeson and Laura Linney as well as other A-List actors, what's not to love? It's an undeniable classic.

Well, it seems as though not everyone agrees...

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Credit: AJ Pics / Alamy

On a recent episode of the Jeremy Vine show, which was later reposted to Twitter, the host tore into the movie, emphasizing that there are five so-called "red flags" that people should be aware of.

The clip starts off with Vine pointing out that all the characters in the film are white except Peter, played by Chiwetel Ejiofor, who is Black. However, he adds that "his best friend is a truly ghastly person", which, weirdly enough, becomes red flag number two.

"This guy is the one who is basically in love with Keira Knightly, who is married," he continues, also questioning: "[Are we] supposed to think it's interesting? It's sort of, somehow, I don't know. Exciting or sympathetic?"

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Credit: Cinematic Collection / Alamy

The 57-year-old then goes and brands him a "stalker" before quickly getting onto red flag number three - "All the couples are straight."

"Where are the gay characters?" He asks.

Moving swiftly on, Vine then turns his attention to Natalie, played by McCutcheon, and points out that there are various moments where her weight is called into question.

"Why the fat shaming?" he asks before it cuts to a montage of clips from Love Actually where the characters are referring to her as "chubby" and "plumpy."

Big yikes.

And last, but not least, the final red flag in Vine's series is the alleged control of all the women by their respective men, even citing the book,  The Stepford Wives, to try and back up his point.

Watch the full clip below:

Of course, this controversial stance has sparked backlash online, with many social media users expressing their disdain for Vine's opinion.

"Can't stand the film but here's an idea.. if it's going to offend you… don't watch it.. problem solved." commented one Twitter user.

"Is this the new Christmas tradition? Picking a Christmas classic and analysing it through the lens of today's political correctness. I don’t know why on earth you would sit through old Christmas films and red flag scenes that you disagree with. What a wasted segment," added another furious user.

A third slammed the entire thing as "pathetic," writing: "This is one of the most pathetic things I have ever seen so I have to assume this is clickbait for an ailing show."

I mean, here's a crazy idea: Why don't we all put an extra bit of effort into making a real-life impact when it comes to social change, rather than with a fictional Christmas movie?

Who's with me?

Featured Image Credit: Keith Jackson / Alamy

People are pointing out all the 'red flags' in Christmas classic 'Love Actually'

vt-author-image

By Nasima Khatun

Article saved!Article saved!

When you think of iconic Christmas films, what comes to mind? Home Alone? Obviously. Elf? Yeah, maybe. And of course, my personal favorite, Love Actually.

Hailed as one of the best festive rom-coms in history, Love Actually follows the "lives of eight very different couples in dealing with their love lives in various loosely interrelated tales all set during a frantic month before Christmas in London, England."

With Hugh Grant and Martine McCutcheon starring in the 2003 movie alongside Liam Neeson and Laura Linney as well as other A-List actors, what's not to love? It's an undeniable classic.

Well, it seems as though not everyone agrees...

wp-image-1263182517 size-large
Credit: AJ Pics / Alamy

On a recent episode of the Jeremy Vine show, which was later reposted to Twitter, the host tore into the movie, emphasizing that there are five so-called "red flags" that people should be aware of.

The clip starts off with Vine pointing out that all the characters in the film are white except Peter, played by Chiwetel Ejiofor, who is Black. However, he adds that "his best friend is a truly ghastly person", which, weirdly enough, becomes red flag number two.

"This guy is the one who is basically in love with Keira Knightly, who is married," he continues, also questioning: "[Are we] supposed to think it's interesting? It's sort of, somehow, I don't know. Exciting or sympathetic?"

wp-image-1263182518 size-large
Credit: Cinematic Collection / Alamy

The 57-year-old then goes and brands him a "stalker" before quickly getting onto red flag number three - "All the couples are straight."

"Where are the gay characters?" He asks.

Moving swiftly on, Vine then turns his attention to Natalie, played by McCutcheon, and points out that there are various moments where her weight is called into question.

"Why the fat shaming?" he asks before it cuts to a montage of clips from Love Actually where the characters are referring to her as "chubby" and "plumpy."

Big yikes.

And last, but not least, the final red flag in Vine's series is the alleged control of all the women by their respective men, even citing the book,  The Stepford Wives, to try and back up his point.

Watch the full clip below:

Of course, this controversial stance has sparked backlash online, with many social media users expressing their disdain for Vine's opinion.

"Can't stand the film but here's an idea.. if it's going to offend you… don't watch it.. problem solved." commented one Twitter user.

"Is this the new Christmas tradition? Picking a Christmas classic and analysing it through the lens of today's political correctness. I don’t know why on earth you would sit through old Christmas films and red flag scenes that you disagree with. What a wasted segment," added another furious user.

A third slammed the entire thing as "pathetic," writing: "This is one of the most pathetic things I have ever seen so I have to assume this is clickbait for an ailing show."

I mean, here's a crazy idea: Why don't we all put an extra bit of effort into making a real-life impact when it comes to social change, rather than with a fictional Christmas movie?

Who's with me?

Featured Image Credit: Keith Jackson / Alamy