Taylor Swift super-fan pays off his college tuition after selling his Eras Tour tickets for $14,000

vt-author-image

By Kim Novak

Article saved!Article saved!

Taylor Swift has inadvertently helped another student to pay off their college tuition bills - all thanks to the ridiculously high resale value of her Eras Tour tickets.

Now any Swifty will know that the 'Style' songstress is no stranger to changing fans' lives, having often gone out of her way to send her most devoted fans personalized gifts as well as paying toward their education.

And while she may not have directly paid off this particular fan's tuition herself, she managed to help him with his college fees by proxy after he racked up a huge $14,000 by reselling his tickets.

Isaac Jarman went viral on TikTok after he revealed his massive stroke of luck by getting such a huge amount in return for his tickets.

He took to the video-sharing platform to tell his followers: "To whoever just bought my Taylor Swift tickets for FOURTEEN THOUSAND dollars, I love you. Thank you for literally paying for my college tuition."

Taylor's song 'Cruel Summer' could be heard playing over the video as he added: "hope you enjoy the show so much. I wish I could be there but also 14k is pretty nice too, idk. Anyways enjoy that fourth row for me."

Fans have had a hard time getting their hands on tickets to the long-awaited tour, with tickets for her fully-booked dates at Inglewood's SoFi Stadium retailing from $49 to $449.

While their retail price isn't unaffordable for Swifties on any level of income, the demand was so great they sold out in minutes and were soon put on resale sites for greatly inflated asking prices.

Those who were lucky enough to bag tickets but decided to try their luck at making a profit on them instead of actually going to the show have been listing them for between $800 and $11,000 online at present, depending on the caliber of the seats.

wp-image-1263224304 size-full
Taylor Swift's Eras Tour tickets were definitely not easy to get on general sale. Credit: Kevin Winter/TAS23/Getty Images for TAS Rights Management

Given Isaac's ones were in the fourth row, it's no wonder they commandeered a hefty price tag.

Understandably, his windfall provoked a mixture of reactions from fans, with some congratulating him on getting such a huge return while others were angry that it was affecting the ticket sales business.

They commented: "Taylor Swift casually destroying the concert industry", and "Turns out the scalpers we've been talking about are ppl our own age."

Others added: "You're real for this and I'm not afraid to say it" and "yall are saying it's outrageous but someone ACTUALLY bought them."

wp-image-1263224302 size-full
Credit: TikTok
wp-image-1263224303 size-full
Credit: TikTok

While that is a ridiculously high price for concert tickets, someone was clearly a big enough fan of Taylor with a big enough bank balance to want to buy them and help Isaac out with his tuition as a bonus.

Featured image credit: Kevin Winter/TAS23/Getty Images for TAS Rights Management

Taylor Swift super-fan pays off his college tuition after selling his Eras Tour tickets for $14,000

vt-author-image

By Kim Novak

Article saved!Article saved!

Taylor Swift has inadvertently helped another student to pay off their college tuition bills - all thanks to the ridiculously high resale value of her Eras Tour tickets.

Now any Swifty will know that the 'Style' songstress is no stranger to changing fans' lives, having often gone out of her way to send her most devoted fans personalized gifts as well as paying toward their education.

And while she may not have directly paid off this particular fan's tuition herself, she managed to help him with his college fees by proxy after he racked up a huge $14,000 by reselling his tickets.

Isaac Jarman went viral on TikTok after he revealed his massive stroke of luck by getting such a huge amount in return for his tickets.

He took to the video-sharing platform to tell his followers: "To whoever just bought my Taylor Swift tickets for FOURTEEN THOUSAND dollars, I love you. Thank you for literally paying for my college tuition."

Taylor's song 'Cruel Summer' could be heard playing over the video as he added: "hope you enjoy the show so much. I wish I could be there but also 14k is pretty nice too, idk. Anyways enjoy that fourth row for me."

Fans have had a hard time getting their hands on tickets to the long-awaited tour, with tickets for her fully-booked dates at Inglewood's SoFi Stadium retailing from $49 to $449.

While their retail price isn't unaffordable for Swifties on any level of income, the demand was so great they sold out in minutes and were soon put on resale sites for greatly inflated asking prices.

Those who were lucky enough to bag tickets but decided to try their luck at making a profit on them instead of actually going to the show have been listing them for between $800 and $11,000 online at present, depending on the caliber of the seats.

wp-image-1263224304 size-full
Taylor Swift's Eras Tour tickets were definitely not easy to get on general sale. Credit: Kevin Winter/TAS23/Getty Images for TAS Rights Management

Given Isaac's ones were in the fourth row, it's no wonder they commandeered a hefty price tag.

Understandably, his windfall provoked a mixture of reactions from fans, with some congratulating him on getting such a huge return while others were angry that it was affecting the ticket sales business.

They commented: "Taylor Swift casually destroying the concert industry", and "Turns out the scalpers we've been talking about are ppl our own age."

Others added: "You're real for this and I'm not afraid to say it" and "yall are saying it's outrageous but someone ACTUALLY bought them."

wp-image-1263224302 size-full
Credit: TikTok
wp-image-1263224303 size-full
Credit: TikTok

While that is a ridiculously high price for concert tickets, someone was clearly a big enough fan of Taylor with a big enough bank balance to want to buy them and help Isaac out with his tuition as a bonus.

Featured image credit: Kevin Winter/TAS23/Getty Images for TAS Rights Management