Bartender makes up to $6,000-a-night slapping Spring Breakers

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By James Kay

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Could this be the best job ever?

I've had my fair share of hospitality jobs, and while sometimes the urge to slap a customer was there... It would have been a fireable offense to actually do it.

One bartender has cracked the code and gets to hit her customers, making loads of money in the process.

At Backyard Fort Lauderdale, 26-year-old bartender Aiyana Callas is serving up her signature "Hurricane Shots" for $30 a pop, every night during the party season.

Callas makes her money serving bizarre shots. Credit: urbazon/Getty

What makes these shots special? It's not just the alcohol – it's the entire slap that comes with it.

Participants take a shot from a glass held in Callas' mouth, followed by a pitcher of water poured over their heads and a slap to the face.

All of this for a mere $30?

Callas ensures that consent is given before the slap and that it's not delivered with full force.

Watch Callas in action:

"I am 100% a performer at best and I'm really good at making it look like I'm slapping them as hard as I can. But I am absolutely not slapping them as hard as I can," Callas told Axios.

The prices for these unique shots vary depending on the alcohol and the intensity of the routine, but regardless, Callas estimates selling about 150 to 200 shots each night.

While Callas didn't invent the concept of the "Hurricane Shot," she's added her own twist to the experience with acrobatic moves and wrestling-style theatrics, adopting the persona of "Hurricane Aiyana."

Would you pay $30 to be slapped? Credit: Jackyenjoyphotography/Getty

Operating as a freelancer, Callas purchases the alcohol from the bar as part of her own entertainment company, which also offers bookings for private parties. She introduced the slap shots last year, quickly becoming a hit among college students seeking an Instagram-worthy moment and a memorable story to share.

"They think it's entertaining, they think it's funny, they think that it's an experience," Callas said. "It's really just all in good fun."

But like a true hurricane, "Hurricane Aiyana" is a seasonal phenomenon, only gracing Fort Lauderdale during the two months of the Spring Break season.

Last year, she worked tirelessly for 45 consecutive days, from 8:00PM to 5:00AM, raking in an impressive $6,000 per night.

In a less fun bartender story, Jemima June took to TikTok to express her displeasure over a customer who ordered a drink with no ice, thinking it would get them more booze.

Not every bartender has the same experience as Callas. Credit: agrobacter/Getty

Jemima captured the interaction where a customer ordered a tequila cranberry drink without ice.

When the customer reiterated their request loudly over the music, Jemima paused and clarified: "Just because you say no ice, that doesn't mean you're going to get more alcohol."

The video prompted a lot of people to offer their thoughts, and many defended the customer, expressing disbelief at the notion of expecting more alcohol with no ice.

One commenter wrote: "never once in my life have I expected more alcohol when asking for no ice... doubt anyone has lol."

Others added: "Maybe he has sensitive teeth and doesn’t like ice touching them???", and: "you couldn't put some more cranberry juice?"

Another joked: "Bro just give him more it’s not like it’s coming out of your paycheck", while someone else added: "Maybe She could’ve put more juice? I’d be mad if they give a cup half empty."

Maybe Jemima should find a way to make money by slapping her customers.

Featured image credit: urbazon/Getty

Bartender makes up to $6,000-a-night slapping Spring Breakers

vt-author-image

By James Kay

Article saved!Article saved!

Could this be the best job ever?

I've had my fair share of hospitality jobs, and while sometimes the urge to slap a customer was there... It would have been a fireable offense to actually do it.

One bartender has cracked the code and gets to hit her customers, making loads of money in the process.

At Backyard Fort Lauderdale, 26-year-old bartender Aiyana Callas is serving up her signature "Hurricane Shots" for $30 a pop, every night during the party season.

Callas makes her money serving bizarre shots. Credit: urbazon/Getty

What makes these shots special? It's not just the alcohol – it's the entire slap that comes with it.

Participants take a shot from a glass held in Callas' mouth, followed by a pitcher of water poured over their heads and a slap to the face.

All of this for a mere $30?

Callas ensures that consent is given before the slap and that it's not delivered with full force.

Watch Callas in action:

"I am 100% a performer at best and I'm really good at making it look like I'm slapping them as hard as I can. But I am absolutely not slapping them as hard as I can," Callas told Axios.

The prices for these unique shots vary depending on the alcohol and the intensity of the routine, but regardless, Callas estimates selling about 150 to 200 shots each night.

While Callas didn't invent the concept of the "Hurricane Shot," she's added her own twist to the experience with acrobatic moves and wrestling-style theatrics, adopting the persona of "Hurricane Aiyana."

Would you pay $30 to be slapped? Credit: Jackyenjoyphotography/Getty

Operating as a freelancer, Callas purchases the alcohol from the bar as part of her own entertainment company, which also offers bookings for private parties. She introduced the slap shots last year, quickly becoming a hit among college students seeking an Instagram-worthy moment and a memorable story to share.

"They think it's entertaining, they think it's funny, they think that it's an experience," Callas said. "It's really just all in good fun."

But like a true hurricane, "Hurricane Aiyana" is a seasonal phenomenon, only gracing Fort Lauderdale during the two months of the Spring Break season.

Last year, she worked tirelessly for 45 consecutive days, from 8:00PM to 5:00AM, raking in an impressive $6,000 per night.

In a less fun bartender story, Jemima June took to TikTok to express her displeasure over a customer who ordered a drink with no ice, thinking it would get them more booze.

Not every bartender has the same experience as Callas. Credit: agrobacter/Getty

Jemima captured the interaction where a customer ordered a tequila cranberry drink without ice.

When the customer reiterated their request loudly over the music, Jemima paused and clarified: "Just because you say no ice, that doesn't mean you're going to get more alcohol."

The video prompted a lot of people to offer their thoughts, and many defended the customer, expressing disbelief at the notion of expecting more alcohol with no ice.

One commenter wrote: "never once in my life have I expected more alcohol when asking for no ice... doubt anyone has lol."

Others added: "Maybe he has sensitive teeth and doesn’t like ice touching them???", and: "you couldn't put some more cranberry juice?"

Another joked: "Bro just give him more it’s not like it’s coming out of your paycheck", while someone else added: "Maybe She could’ve put more juice? I’d be mad if they give a cup half empty."

Maybe Jemima should find a way to make money by slapping her customers.

Featured image credit: urbazon/Getty