Doctor reveals the one huge health concern that men who watch too much p*rn will eventually suffer

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By James Kay

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A doctor has warned men who watch excessive p*rnography about a health concern they "will eventually" suffer.

People all around the world consume adult content, whether they want to admit it or not.

It can be a pretty taboo subject as it's usually something people do privately,

The consumption of adult content among men is notably high and continues to dominate internet traffic. According to Psychology Today, men make up approximately 80% of the global audience for P*rnhub, while women account for about 26%​.

GettyImages-AA023548.jpgAdult content can have an implications on your health. Credit: Don Farrall/Getty

This significant gender disparity highlights that men are more likely to view adult content compared to women.

In terms of frequency, a 2019 study found that 69% of American men reported having viewed p*rnography within the past year​, per Ballard Brief.

The highest engagement comes from younger demographics, particularly those aged 18 to 34, with over half of this age group seeking out adult content frequently​.

Now, a doctor has revealed a huge health concern men should be wary of when watching p*rn. He has raised concerns about the potential link between excessive p*rn consumption and erectile dysfunction (ED).

Dr. Alan Mandell, known as the "Motivational Doctor" online, has taken to social media to raise awareness about the dangers of watching too much adult content and frequent m*sturbation.

In a video shared on social media, Dr. Mandell warned that watching p*rn and "m*sturbating all the time" will "eventually lead to erectile dysfunction."

"Too much sexual stimulation is not good. You're overloading the reward system in your brain that's causing dopamine, those happy chemicals that are being secreted from the brain. And eventually, you will get desensitized to sexual stimulation."

He further cautioned: "So when you start cutting out [adult content] and m*sturbating you will see significant results."

The doctor's concerns are supported by other medical professionals.

GettyImages-175416902.jpgAdult content could cause erectile dysfunction. Credit: pagadesign/Getty

HealthMatch, a healthcare resource website, reports that erectile dysfunction can indeed be "p*rn-induced" (PIED), and "several studies" have found "a link between compulsive adult content use and reduced sex drive and/or ED."

Although the exact causal relationship is still debated, HealthMatch notes that PIED is considered a "psychological rather than physical" factor, with "excessive viewing of p*rnography contribut[ing] to erection difficulties by impacting the brain."

Some experts suggest that excessive adult content viewing can lead to desensitization to real-life sexual encounters, as viewers may become accustomed to the heightened stimulation of p*rn.

As HealthMatch explains: "Because of the conditioning and desensitization, partnered sex may no longer trigger the sufficient release of dopamine needed for producing and sustaining erections. This is also because p*rnography is believed to alter the brain's motivational system."

While the condition remains a topic of debate among experts, HealthMatch argues that the "possible role that p*rnography plays is worth considering," especially given the "increasing rates of erectile dysfunction in young people."

GettyImages-607144825.jpgIt's advised to limit adult content usage. Credit: Peter Dazeley/Getty

According to the website, around 30 million men in the US are currently affected by ED, and the "increasing rates of sexual dysfunction in men under the age of 40" have led some to believe that internet p*rnography could be a contributing factor.

Very Well Health reports that around 40 percent of ED cases are considered psychogenic, meaning "the inability to achieve or maintain an erection during sex due to psychological factors."

If individuals are experiencing difficulties with getting or sustaining an erection, it may be advisable to evaluate their p*rnography consumption and, if necessary, consult with a mental health professional or doctor to identify potential underlying causes.

Treatment options for PIED may include talking therapy, mindfulness techniques, and exercise to support reducing adult content intake.

Featured image credit: Isabel Pavia/Getty

Doctor reveals the one huge health concern that men who watch too much p*rn will eventually suffer

vt-author-image

By James Kay

Article saved!Article saved!

A doctor has warned men who watch excessive p*rnography about a health concern they "will eventually" suffer.

People all around the world consume adult content, whether they want to admit it or not.

It can be a pretty taboo subject as it's usually something people do privately,

The consumption of adult content among men is notably high and continues to dominate internet traffic. According to Psychology Today, men make up approximately 80% of the global audience for P*rnhub, while women account for about 26%​.

GettyImages-AA023548.jpgAdult content can have an implications on your health. Credit: Don Farrall/Getty

This significant gender disparity highlights that men are more likely to view adult content compared to women.

In terms of frequency, a 2019 study found that 69% of American men reported having viewed p*rnography within the past year​, per Ballard Brief.

The highest engagement comes from younger demographics, particularly those aged 18 to 34, with over half of this age group seeking out adult content frequently​.

Now, a doctor has revealed a huge health concern men should be wary of when watching p*rn. He has raised concerns about the potential link between excessive p*rn consumption and erectile dysfunction (ED).

Dr. Alan Mandell, known as the "Motivational Doctor" online, has taken to social media to raise awareness about the dangers of watching too much adult content and frequent m*sturbation.

In a video shared on social media, Dr. Mandell warned that watching p*rn and "m*sturbating all the time" will "eventually lead to erectile dysfunction."

"Too much sexual stimulation is not good. You're overloading the reward system in your brain that's causing dopamine, those happy chemicals that are being secreted from the brain. And eventually, you will get desensitized to sexual stimulation."

He further cautioned: "So when you start cutting out [adult content] and m*sturbating you will see significant results."

The doctor's concerns are supported by other medical professionals.

GettyImages-175416902.jpgAdult content could cause erectile dysfunction. Credit: pagadesign/Getty

HealthMatch, a healthcare resource website, reports that erectile dysfunction can indeed be "p*rn-induced" (PIED), and "several studies" have found "a link between compulsive adult content use and reduced sex drive and/or ED."

Although the exact causal relationship is still debated, HealthMatch notes that PIED is considered a "psychological rather than physical" factor, with "excessive viewing of p*rnography contribut[ing] to erection difficulties by impacting the brain."

Some experts suggest that excessive adult content viewing can lead to desensitization to real-life sexual encounters, as viewers may become accustomed to the heightened stimulation of p*rn.

As HealthMatch explains: "Because of the conditioning and desensitization, partnered sex may no longer trigger the sufficient release of dopamine needed for producing and sustaining erections. This is also because p*rnography is believed to alter the brain's motivational system."

While the condition remains a topic of debate among experts, HealthMatch argues that the "possible role that p*rnography plays is worth considering," especially given the "increasing rates of erectile dysfunction in young people."

GettyImages-607144825.jpgIt's advised to limit adult content usage. Credit: Peter Dazeley/Getty

According to the website, around 30 million men in the US are currently affected by ED, and the "increasing rates of sexual dysfunction in men under the age of 40" have led some to believe that internet p*rnography could be a contributing factor.

Very Well Health reports that around 40 percent of ED cases are considered psychogenic, meaning "the inability to achieve or maintain an erection during sex due to psychological factors."

If individuals are experiencing difficulties with getting or sustaining an erection, it may be advisable to evaluate their p*rnography consumption and, if necessary, consult with a mental health professional or doctor to identify potential underlying causes.

Treatment options for PIED may include talking therapy, mindfulness techniques, and exercise to support reducing adult content intake.

Featured image credit: Isabel Pavia/Getty