Doctor shares simple trick to stop people from snoring

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By VT

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We all know there's nothing more annoying when you're trying to go to sleep than listening to someone else snoring.

Seriously, when it's getting late and you've got to get up early the next day, it can be really aggravating lying there in the dark next to someone whose sinuses are making a noise like a chainsaw revving.

So if you're missing out on some much-needed shut-eye because of someone else's loud snoring, then I have some good news for you. A doctor has gone viral on social media this week after sharing a simple trick to stop other people from snoring.

Take a look at the video on the snoring hack here:

According to news.com.au, the genius hack was shared on the British daytime talk show This Morning, when hosts Holly Willoughby and Philip Schofield conducted a virtual interview with sleep expert Dr. Sophia Bostock.

In the interview in question, Dr. Bostock explained that snoring often occurs when someone sleeps on their back.

However, if you contrive a way to attach a tennis ball, or similar-shaped object, to the back of your pajamas, this will prevent you from resting horizontally - and supposedly keep you from snoring.

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Credit: Pexels

Dr. Bostock stated:

"Snoring gets worse when you lie on your back because when you lie on your back your mouth is more likely to open.

"Anything you can do to keep yourself leaning on the side should help. A tennis ball sewn into the back of your pajamas can make it uncomfortable."

While you're at it, take a look at this hilarious video of a man pranking his wife with an egg yolk:

Meanwhile, internationally-renowned Harley Street therapist Karl Rollison concurred with Dr. Bostock's method, stating in an interview with Tyla: "When we sleep on our backs the tongue and soft palate relax, succumb to gravity and rest on the back of the throat and make a vibrating noise.

"The jaw also relaxes so the lips open and the mouth becomes an organic echo chamber amplifying the sound.

"So, when we snore our heads become big, squidgy speakers playing really bad music. Sleeping on your side is less restrictive on the airways and creates better airflow. This is one of the reasons unconscious people are placed in the recovery position."

Doctor shares simple trick to stop people from snoring

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

We all know there's nothing more annoying when you're trying to go to sleep than listening to someone else snoring.

Seriously, when it's getting late and you've got to get up early the next day, it can be really aggravating lying there in the dark next to someone whose sinuses are making a noise like a chainsaw revving.

So if you're missing out on some much-needed shut-eye because of someone else's loud snoring, then I have some good news for you. A doctor has gone viral on social media this week after sharing a simple trick to stop other people from snoring.

Take a look at the video on the snoring hack here:

According to news.com.au, the genius hack was shared on the British daytime talk show This Morning, when hosts Holly Willoughby and Philip Schofield conducted a virtual interview with sleep expert Dr. Sophia Bostock.

In the interview in question, Dr. Bostock explained that snoring often occurs when someone sleeps on their back.

However, if you contrive a way to attach a tennis ball, or similar-shaped object, to the back of your pajamas, this will prevent you from resting horizontally - and supposedly keep you from snoring.

 wp-image-12634980
Credit: Pexels

Dr. Bostock stated:

"Snoring gets worse when you lie on your back because when you lie on your back your mouth is more likely to open.

"Anything you can do to keep yourself leaning on the side should help. A tennis ball sewn into the back of your pajamas can make it uncomfortable."

While you're at it, take a look at this hilarious video of a man pranking his wife with an egg yolk:

Meanwhile, internationally-renowned Harley Street therapist Karl Rollison concurred with Dr. Bostock's method, stating in an interview with Tyla: "When we sleep on our backs the tongue and soft palate relax, succumb to gravity and rest on the back of the throat and make a vibrating noise.

"The jaw also relaxes so the lips open and the mouth becomes an organic echo chamber amplifying the sound.

"So, when we snore our heads become big, squidgy speakers playing really bad music. Sleeping on your side is less restrictive on the airways and creates better airflow. This is one of the reasons unconscious people are placed in the recovery position."